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SPIRES-BOOKS: FIND KEYWORD ENVIRONMENTAL LAW *END*INIT* use /tmp/qspiwww.webspi1/2183.66 QRY 131.225.70.96 . find keyword environmental law ( in books using www Cover
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Call number:9781420041583:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:The CRC handbook of mechanical engineering [electronic resource]
Author(s): Frank Kreith (ed.)
D. Yogi Goswami (ed.)
Date:2005
Edition:2nd ed.
Publisher:Boca Raton: CRC Press
Size:1 online resource
Contents:Mechanics of solids, Bela I. Sandor -- Engineering thermodynamics, Michael J. Moran -- Fluid mechanics, Frank Kreith -- Heat and mass transfer. Frank Kreith -- Electrical engineering, Giorgio Rizzoni -- Human-machine interaction, Thomas B. Sheridan -- Energy resources, D. Yogi Goswami -- Energy conversion, D. Yogi Goswami -- Air-conditioning and refrigeration, Herbert A. Ingley and Shan K. Wang -- Transportation, Frank Kreith -- Engineering design, Ashok V. Kumar -- Materials, Bhuvenesh C. Goswami - - Modern manufacturing, Scott Smith -- Robotics, Frank Lewis -- MEMS technology, Mohamed Gad-el-Hak -- Environmental engineering, Ari Rabl nd Jan F. Kreider -- Engineering economics and project management, Chan S. Park and Donald D. Tippett -- Nanotechnol ogy, Sergey Edward Lyshevski -- Mathematics, William F. Ames and George Cain -- Patent law and miscellaneous topics, Frank Kreith.
ISBN:9781420041583
Series:Mechanical engineering handbook series
Series:eBooks
Series:CRCnetBASE eBooks
Keywords: Mechanical engineering
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Call number:SPRINGER-2014-9781461492726:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Physics of Societal Issues [electronic resource] : Calculations on National Security, Environment, and Energy
Author(s): David Hafemeister
Date:2014
Edition:2nd ed. 2014
Publisher:New York, NY : Springer New York : Imprint: Springer
Size:1 online resource
Note:This book provides the reader with essential tools needed to analyze complex societal issues and demonstrates the transition from physics to modern-day laws and treaties. This second edition features new equation-orientedmaterial and extensive data s ets drawing upon current information from experts in their fields. Problems to challenge the reader and extend discussion are presented on three timely issues: National Security:Weapons, Offense, Defense, Verification, Nuclear Proliferation, Terrorism Environment: Air/Water, Nuclear, Climate Change, EM Fields/Epidemiology Energy: Current Energy Situation, Buildings, SolarBuildings, Renewable Energy, Enhanced End-Use Efficiency, Transportation, Economics Praise for the first edition: This insight is n eeded in Congress and the Executive Branch. Hafemeister, a former Congressional fellow with wideWashington experience, has written a book for physicists, chemists and engineers who want to learn science and policy on weapons, energy, and the environment. Scientists who want to make a difference will want this book. RichardScribner, first Director, Congressional Science and Engineering Fellow Program, AAAS Hafemeister shows how much one can understand about nuclear weapons and missile issues through simpl e back-of-the-envelope calculations. He alsoprovides compact explanations of the partially successful attempts that have been made over the past 60 years to control these weapons of mass destruction. Hopefully, Physics of Societal Issues will help interes t a new generation ofphysicists in continuing this work. Frank von Hippel, Professor, Princeton, former Assistant Director, National Security, White House, OSTP Energy policy must be quantitative. People who don't calculate economic tradeoffs oftenchampi on simplistic hardware. The solution is more... nuclear power, or electric cars, or photovoltaics, etc. Some simple physics will s
Contents:Nuclear Weapons
The Offense: Missiles and War Games
The Defense: ABM/SDI/BMD/NMD
Verification and Arms Control Treaties
Nuclear Proliferation and Terrorism
Air and Water Pollution
Nuclear Pollution
Climate Change
Electromagnetic Fields and Epidemiology
The Energy Situation and Fossil Fuels
Energy in Buildings
Solar Buildings
Renewable Energy
Enhanced End
Use Efficiency
Transportation
Energy Economics
Appendix A: Nuclear Arms Chronology
Appendix B: Energy/ Environment Chronology
Appendix C: Nuclear
Age History
Appendix D: Units
Appendi
ISBN:9781461492726
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink
Series:Physics and Astronomy (Springer-11651)
Keywords: Renewable energy sources , Nuclear engineering , Environmental law
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Call number:SPRINGER-2013-9781461471011:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:An Introduction to Heavy-Tailed and Subexponential Distributions [electronic resource]
Author(s): Sergey Foss
Dmitry Korshunov
Stan Zachary
Date:2013
Edition:2nd ed. 2013
Publisher:New York, NY : Springer New York : Imprint: Springer
Size:1 online resource
Note:Springer e-book platform
Note:Springer 2013 e-book collections
Note:Heavy-tailed probability distributions are an important component in the modeling of many stochastic systems. They are frequently used to accurately model inputs and outputs of computer and data networks and service facilitiessuch as call centers. Th ey are an essential for describing risk processes in finance and also for insurance premia pricing, and such distributions occur naturally in models of epidemiological spread. The class includes distributionswith power law tails such as the Pareto, as wel l as the lognormal and certain Weibull distributions. One of the highlights of this new edition is that it includes problems at the end of each chapter. Chapter 5 is also updated toinclude interesting applications to queueing theory, risk, and branching processes. New results are presented in a simple, coherent and systematic way. Graduate students as well as modelers in the fields of finance, insurance, networkscience and environmental studies will find this book to be an essential reference
Note:Springer eBooks
Contents:Preface
Introduction
Heavy
and long
tailed distributions
Subexponential distributions
Densities and local probabilities
Maximum of random walks
References
Index
ISBN:9781461471011
Series:e-books
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer Series in Operations Research and Financial Engineering, 1431-8598
Series:Mathematics and Statistics (Springer-11649)
Keywords: Mathematics , Distribution (Probability theory) , Economics Statistics
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Call number:SPRINGER-2012-9781461438229:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Light Pollution [electronic resource] : Responses and Remedies
Author(s): Bob Mizon
Date:2012
Edition:2nd ed. 2012
Publisher:New York, NY : Springer New York : Imprint: Springer
Size:1 online resource
Note:Springer e-book platform
Note:Springer 2013 e-book collections
Note:Light pollution is a major threat to astronomy across the entire developed world. The night sky that most of us can see bears little relationship to the spectacular vistas that our ancestors have gazed at fortens of thousands ofyears. It is ironic th at as our understanding of the universe has improved, our ability to see it has been dramatically reduced by the skyglow of our civilization. In the second edition of Light Pollution - Responses and Remedies, BobMizon delves into the history and practice of lighting and how its misue has not only stolen the stars, but blighted our lives and those of our fellow-creatures on this planet. This book suggests how we can win back the night sky andat the same time save energy and money, improve our health, and e ven lower crime rate! It also includes a list of targets for urban stargazers, and recommendations for ensuring sane lighting worldwide
Note:Springer eBooks
Contents:Preface
Part I: The Gift of Light?
Chapter 1: Living with Light
Chapter 2: Light Pollution
The Problem Defined
Chapter 3: Adverse Impacts of Inefficient Artificial Lighting
Chapter 4: Artificial Lighting, Quality of Life and Health
Chapter 5: Artificial Lighting and Crime
Chapter 6: Quantifying the Problem
Part II: Piercing the Veil
Techniques and Targets
Chapter 7: Techniques
Chapter 8: Targets
Part III: Dark Future?
Chapter 9: Light Pollution Solutions for the Twenty
First Century
Appendices
Appendix 1: The StarLight Conference 2007: Declaration
ISBN:9781461438229
Series:e-books
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Patrick Moore's Practical Astronomy Series, 1431-9756
Series:Physics and Astronomy (Springer-11651)
Keywords: Astronomy , Environmental law
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Call number:SPRINGER-2012-9781461438212:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Light Pollution [electronic resource]
Author(s): Bob Mizon
Date:2012
Edition:2nd ed. 2012
Publisher:Springer New York
Size:1 online resource
Note:Popular science
Note:Springer 2012 Physics and Astronomy eBook collection
Note:Springer e-book platform
ISBN:9781461438212
Series:Practical Astronomy
Series:e-books
Keywords: Astronomy, Observations and Techniques , Popular Science in Astronomy , Environmental Law/Policy/Ecojustice , Energy Policy, Economics and Management
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Call number:SPRINGER-2011-9781441994738:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:An Introduction to Heavy-Tailed and Subexponential Distributions [electronic resource]
Author(s): Sergey Foss
Dmitry Korshunov
Stan Zachary
Date:2011
Edition:1
Publisher:New York, NY : Springer New York
Size:1 online resource
Note:Springer e-book platform
Note:Springer 2013 e-book collections
Note:Heavy-tailed probability distributions are an important component in the modelingof many stochastic systems. They are frequently used to accurately model inputs and outputs of computer and data networks and service facilitiessuch as call centers. The y are an essential for describingrisk processes in finance and also for insurance premia pricing, and such distributions occur naturally in models of epidemiological spread. The class includes distributionswith power law tails such asthe Pareto, as well a s the lognormal and certain Weibull distributions. This monograph defines the classes oflong-tailed and subexponential distributions in one dimension and provides a complete andcomprehensive description of their properties. New results are presented in a simple, coherent and systematic way. This leads to a comprehensive exposition of tail properties of sums of independent random variables whose distributionsbelong to the long-tailed and subexponential class. The book includes adiscussion of and references to contemporary areas of applications and also contains preliminary mathematicalmaterialwhich makes the book self contained.Modelers in the fields of finance, insurance, network science and environmental studies will find this book to be an essential ref erence
Note:Springer eBooks
Contents:Preface
Introduction
Heavy
and long
tailed distributions
Subexponential distributions
Densities and local probabilities
Maximum of random walks
References
Index
ISBN:9781441994738
Series:e-books
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer Series in Operations Research and Financial Engineering, 1431-8598 : v38
Series:Mathematics and Statistics (Springer-11649)
Keywords: Mathematics , Distribution (Probability theory) , Economics Statistics
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Call number:SPRINGER-2011-9781441993656:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:The Second Law of Economics [electronic resource] Energy, Entropy, and the Origins of Wealth
Author(s): Reiner Kmmel
Date:2011
Publisher:New York, NY : Springer New York : Imprint: Springer
Size:1 online resource
Note:Springer e-book platform
Note:Springer 2013 e-book collections
Note:Nothing happens in the world without energy conversion and entropy production. These fundamental natural laws are familiar to most of us when applied to the evolution of stars, biological processes, or the working of an internalcombustion engine, but what about industrial economies and wealth production, or their constant companion, pollution? Does economics conform to the First and the Second Law of Thermodynamics? In this important book, ReinerKmmel takes us on a fascinating tour of these laws and their influence on natural, technological, and social evolution. Analyzing economic growth in Germany, Japan, and the United States in light of technological constraints oncapital, labor, and energy, Professor Kmmel upends conventional economic wisdom by showing that the productive power of energy far outweighs its small share of costs, while for labor just the opposite is true. Wealth creation byenergy conversion is accompanied and limited by polluting emissions that are coupled to entropy production. Th ese facts constitute the Second Law of Economics. They take on unprecedented importance in a world that is facing peakoil, debt-driven economic turmoil, and threats from pollution and climate change. They complement the First Law of Economics: Wealth is a llocated on markets, and the legal framework determines the outcome. By applying the First andSecond Law we understand the true origins of wealth production, the issues that imperil the goal of sustainable development, and the technological options that a re compatible both with this goal and with natural laws. The criticalrole of energy and entropy in the productive sectors of the economy must be realized if we are to create a road map that avoids a Dark Age of shrinking natural resources, environmental d egradation, and increasing social tensions
Note:Springer eBooks
ISBN:9781441993656
Series:e-books
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:The Frontiers Collection, 1612-3018
Series:Physics and Astronomy (Springer-11651)
Keywords: Thermodynamics , Engineering economy , Sustainable development , Environmental economics
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Call number:SPRINGER-2000-9781461212164:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Statistical Science in the Courtroom
Author(s):
Date:2000
Size:1 online resource (443 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-1-4612-1216-4
Contents:1. Interpretation of Evidence, and Sample Size Determination -- 2. Statistical Issues in the Application of the Federal Sentencing Guidelines in Drug, Pornography, and Fraud Cases -- 3. Interpreting DNA evidence: Can Probability
Theory Help? -- 4.Statistics, Litigation, and Conduct Unbecoming -- 5. The Consequences of Defending DNA Statistics -- 6. DNA Statistics Under Trial in the Australian Adversarial System -- 7. A Likelihood Approach to DNA Evidence -- 8.
The Choice of Hypotheses in the Evaluation of DNA Profile Evidence -- 9. On the Evolution of Analytical Proof, Statistics, and the Use of Experts in EEO Litigation -- 10. A Connecticut Jury Array Challenge -- 11. Issues arising in the
Use of Statistical Evidence in Discrimination Cases -- 12. Statistical Consulting in the Legal Environment -- 13. Epidemiological Causation in the Legal Context: Substance and Procedures -- 14. Judicial Review of Statistical Analyses
in Environmental Rulemakings -- 15. Statistical Testimony on Damages inMinnesota v. Tobacco Industry -- 16. Statistical Issues in the Estimation of the Causal Effects of Smoking Due to the Conduct of the Tobacco Industry -- 17.
Forensic Statistics and Multiparty Bayesianism -- 18. Warranty Contracts and Equilibrium Probabilities -- 19 .Death and Deterrence: Notes on a Still Inchoate Judicial Inquiry -- 20. Introduction to Two Views on theShonubiCase -- 21.
TheShonubiCase as an Example of the Legal System’s Failure to Appreciate Statistical Evidence -- 22. Assessing the Statistical Evidence in theShonubicase
ISBN:9781461212164
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Keywords: Statistics , Statistics , Statistics for Social Science, Behavorial Science, Education, Public Policy, and
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Call number:SPRINGER-1999-9783642980275:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Combustion Physical and Chemical Fundamentals, Modeling and Simulation, Experiments, Pollutant Formation
Author(s): Jürgen Warnatz
Date:1999
Edition:Second Edition
Size:1 online resource (299 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-3-642-98027-5
Contents:1 Introduction, Fundamental Definitions and Phenomena -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Some Fundamental Definitions -- 1.3 Basic Flame Types -- 1.4 Exercises -- 2 Experimental Investigation of Flames -- 2.1 Velocity Measurements -- 2.2
Density Measurement -- 2.3 Concentration Measurements -- 2.4 Temperature Measurements -- 2.5 Pressure Measurements -- 2.6 Measurement of Particle Sizes -- 2.7 Simultaneous Diagnostics -- 2.8 Exercises -- 3 Mathematical Description of
Premixed Laminar Flat Flames -- 3.1 Conservation Equations for Laminar Flat Premixed Flames -- 3.2 Heat and Mass Transport -- 3.3 The Description of a Laminar Premixed Flat Flame Front -- 3.4 Exercises -- 4 Thermodynamics of Combustion
Processes -- 4.1 The First Law of Thermodynamics -- 4.2 Standard Enthalpies of Formation -- 4.3 Heat Capacities -- 4.4 The Second Law of Thermodynamics -- 4.5 The Third Law of Thermodynamics -- 4.6 Equilibrium Criteria and
Thermodynamic Variables -- 4.7 Equilibrium in Gas Mixtures Chemical Potential -- 4.8 Determination of Equilibrium Compositions in Gases -- 4.9 Determination of Adiabatic Flame Temoeratures -- 4.10 Tabulation of Thermodynamic Data --
4.11 Exercises -- 5 Transport Phenomena -- 5.1 A Simple Physical Model of the Transport Processes -- 5.2 Heat Conduction in Gases -- 5.3 Viscosity of Gases -- 5.4 Diffusion in Gases -- 5.5 Thermal Diffusion, Dufour Effect, and Pressure
Diffusion -- 5.6 Comparison with Experiments -- 5.7 Exercises -- 6 Chemical Kinetics -- 6.1 Rate Laws and Reaction Orders -- 6.2 Relation of Forward and Reverse Reactions -- 6.3 Elementary Reactions, Reaction Molecularity -- 6.4
Experimental Investigation of Elementarv Reactions -- 6.5 Temperature Dependence of Rate Coefficients -- 6.6 Pressure Dependence of Rate Coefficients -- 6.7 Surface Reactions -- 6.8 Exercises -- 7. Reaction Mechanisms -- 7.1
Characteristics of Reaction Mechanisms -- 7.2 Analysis of Reaction Mechanisms -- 7.3 Stiffness of Ordinary Differential Equation Systems -- 7.4 Simplification of Reaction Mechanisms -- 7.5 Radical Chain Reactions -- 7.6 Exercises -- 8
Laminar Premixed Flames -- 8.1 Zeldovich’s Analysis of Flame Propagation -- 8.2 Numerical Solution of the Conservation Equations -- 8.3 Flame Structures -- 8.4 Flame Velocities -- 8.5 Sensitivity Analysis -- 8.6 Exercises -- 9 Laminar
Nonpremixed Flames -- 9.1 Counterflow Nonpremixed Flames -- 9.2 Laminar Jet Nonpremixed Flames -- 9.3 Nonpremixed Flames With Fast Chemistry -- 9.4 Exercises -- 10 Ignition Processes -- 10.1 Semenov’s Analysis of Thermal Explosions --
10.2 Frank-Kamenetskii’s Analysis of Thermal Explosions -- 10.3 Autoignition: Ignition Limits -- 10.4 Autoignition: Ignition-Delay Time -- 10.5 Induced Ignition, Minimum Ignition Energies -- 10.6 Spark Ignition -- 10.7 Detonations --
10.8 Exercises -- 11 The Navier-Stokes-Equations for Three-Dimensional Reacting Flows -- 11.1 The Conservation Equations -- 11.2 The Empirical Laws -- 11.3 Appendix: Some Definitions and Laws from Vector- and Tensor-Analysis -- 11.4
Exercises -- 12 Turbulent Reacting Flows -- 12.1 Some Fundamental Phenomena -- 12.2 Direct Numerical Simulation -- 12.3 Concepts for Turbulence Modeling: Probability Density Functions (PDFs) -- 12.4 Concepts for Turbulence Modeling:
Time- and Favre-Averaging -- 12.5 Averaged Conservation Equations -- 12.6 Turbulence Models -- 12.7 Mean Reaction Rates -- 12.8 Eddy-Break-Up-Models -- 12.9 Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) -- 12.10 Turbulent Scales -- 12.11 Exercises -- 13
Turbulent Nonpremixed Flames -- 13.1 Nonpremixed Flames with Equilibrium Chemistry -- 13.2 Finite-Rate Chemistry in Nonpremixed Flames -- 13.3 Flame Extinction -- 13.4 PDF-Simulations of Turbulent Non-Premixed Flames -- 13.5 Exercises
-- 14 Turbulent Premixed Flames -- 14.1 Classification of Turbulent Premixed Flames -- 14.2 Flamelet Models -- 14.3 Turbulent Flame Velocity -- 14.4 Flame Extinction -- 14.5 Other Models of Turbulent Premixed Combustion -- 14.6
Exercises -- 15 Combustion of Liquid and Solid Fuels -- 15.1 Droplet and Spray Combustion -- 15.2 Coal Combustion -- 16 Low-Temperature Oxidation, Engine Knock -- 16.1 Fundamental Phenomena -- 16.2 High-Temperature Oxidation -- 16.3
Low-Temperature Oxidation -- 16.4 Knock Damages -- 16.5 Exercises -- 17 Formation of Nitric Oxides -- 17.1 Thermal NO (Zeldovich-NO) -- 17.2 Prompt NO (Fenimore-NO) -- 17.3 NO Generated via Nitrous Oxide -- 17.4 Conversion of Fuel
Nitrogen into NO -- 17.5 NO Reduction by Combustion Modifications -- 17.6 Catalytic Combustion -- 17.7 NO-Reduction by Post-Combustion Processes -- 18 Formation of Hydrocarbons and Soot -- 18.1 Unburnt Hydrocarbons -- 18.2 Formation of
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) -- 18.3 The Phenomenology of Soot Formation -- 18.4 Modelling and Simulation of Soot Formation -- 19 References -- 20 Index
ISBN:9783642980275
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Keywords: Physics , Physical chemistry , Fluids , Thermodynamics , Air pollution , Physics , Thermodynamics , Physical Chemistry , Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution , Fluid- and Aerodynamics , Environmental Monitoring/Analysis
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Call number:SPRINGER-1997-9789401156202:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:The Interstellar Medium in Galaxies
Author(s):
Date:1997
Size:1 online resource (212 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-94-011-5620-2
Contents:1 Dust in the Disks of Galaxies -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Dust models and their consequences -- 3 Heating sources and phases of the dust -- 4 The fate of dust in the ISM, and future instruments -- 5 Conclusion -- 2 Molecular Gas in
Galaxy Disks -- 1 Introduction -- 2 How well can we measure the mass of molecular gas? -- 3 H2 vs. HI -- 4 Spiral structure in the outer disks -- 5 The central few kiloparsecs -- 6 Circumnuclear regions -- 7 Vertical distribution of
molecular gas -- 8 Gas disks around active galactic nuclei -- 3 Cool HI Disks in Galaxies -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Neutral Hydrogen Content and Global Properties -- 3 Distribution of HI in Disks -- 4 HI as a Tracer of the Mass
Distribution -- 5 Relationship of ?HI to Star Formation -- 6 Environmental Effects -- 7 Future prospects -- 4 The Warm Ionized Medium and the Disk-Halo Connection in Galaxies -- 1 Introduction -- 2 The WIM of the Milky Way -- 3 New
Theoretical Developments on the Origin and Maintenance of WIMs -- 4 Observations of Diffuse Ionized Gas in External Galaxies -- 5 Conclusions -- 5 Hot Gas and X-Rays -- 1 Is there Hot Gas in Normal Galaxies? -- 2 Hot Gas in Late Type
Galaxies -- 3 Hot Gas in Early Type Galaxies -- 6 Abundance Gradients in Spiral Galaxies -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Background Information -- 3 Results -- 4 Conclusions -- 7 From Gas to Stars: Regulation of Star Formation -- 1 Introduction
-- 2 The Schmidt law -- 3 Star formation thresholds -- 4 Regulation of the SFR -- 8 Subject Index -- 9 Object Index -- 10 List of Symbols
ISBN:9789401156202
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Series:Astrophysics and Space Science Library: 219
Keywords: Physics , Observations, Astronomical , Astronomy , Physics , Astronomy, Observations and Techniques
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Call number:SPRINGER-1997-9783642604812:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Turbulence and Diffusion in the Atmosphere Lectures in Environmental Sciences
Author(s): Alfred K Blackadar
Date:1997
Size:1 online resource (185 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-3-642-60481-2
Contents:1 The Nature of Turbulence -- 1.1 Two-Dimensional Eddies in the Atmosphere -- 1.2 The Reynolds Number and Its Significance -- 1.3 The Reynolds Approach to the Equations of a Turbulent Fluid -- 1.4 Averaging the Equation of Continuity
-- 1.5 Fluxes and the General Conservation Equation -- 1.6 The Closure Problem -- 1.7 First-Order Closure — Exchange Theory -- 1.8 Problems -- 2 The Navier—Stokes Equations -- 2.1 The Nature of Stress -- 2.2 Invariants of Fluid Motions
-- 2.3 The Navier—Stokes Equations -- 2.4 Reynolds Number Similarity -- 2.5 Averaging the Navier—Stokes Equations -- 2.6 Problems -- 3 The Neutral Surface Boundary Layer -- 3.1 Overview of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer -- 3.2 Wind
Distribution in the Neutral Surface Layer -- 3.3 Mean Flow in the Vicinity of the Surface -- 3.4 Miscellaneous Topics -- 3.5 Distribution of Passive Mean Properties -- 3.6 Problems -- 4 The Energy Equations of Turbulence -- 4.1 Energy
of the Instantaneous State of a Fluid -- 4.2 Work Done on the Boundary -- 4.3 Heat -- 4.4 The Energy Equations and Energy Transformations -- 4.5 The Second Law of Thermodynamics -- 4.6 The Boussinesq Approximation -- 4.7 Open Systems
-- 4.8 Energy Transformations in a Turbulent System -- 4.9 Problems -- 5 Diabatic Surface Boundary Layers -- 5.1 Heat Flux in the Surface Layer -- 5.2 The Richardson Number and the Criterion of Turbulence -- 5.3 Wind Profile Similarity
-- 5.4 Profiles of Mean Temperature -- 5.5 Some Useful Relationships -- 5.6 Problems -- 6 Homogeneous Stationary Planetary Layers -- 6.1 The Ekman Spiral -- 6.2 A Two-Layer Model of the PBL -- 6.3 Universal Wind Hodograph and the
Resistance Laws -- 6.4 The Mixed Layer of the Ocean -- 6.5 Problems -- 7 Unconstrained Boundary Layers -- 7.1 Flow downwind of a Change of Roughness -- 7.2 Non-stationary Boundary Layers -- 7.3 The Surface Heat Balance Equation -- 7.4
Daytime Conditions in the PBL -- 7.5 The Planetary Boundary Layer at Night -- 7.6 Model Simulation of the PBL -- 7.7 Problems -- 8 Statistical Representation of Turbulence I -- 8.1 Scaling Statistical Variables in the PBL -- 8.2
Vertical Distributions of the Variances -- 8.3 Problems -- 9 Statistical Representation of Turbulence II -- 9.1 Spectrum and Cross Spectrum of Turbulence -- 9.2 Spatial Representation of Turbulence -- 9.3 The Equilibrium Theory of
Turbulence -- 9.4 The Inertial Subrange -- 9.5 Surface Layer Velocity Component Spectra -- 9.6 Mixed Layer Velocity Component Spectra -- 9.7 Spectra of Scalar Quantities Including Temperature -- 9.8 Cospectra and Quadrature Spectra --
9.9 Problems -- 10 Turbulent Diffusion from Discrete Sources -- 10.1 Morphology of Smoke Plumes -- 10.2 Continuity Principles -- 10.3 Fickian Diffusion -- 10.4 The Gaussian Distribution Function -- 10.5 Taylor’s Diffusion Equation --
10.6 Spectral Representation of Taylor’s Equation -- 10.7 Stability Parameters -- 10.8 Gaussian Plume Models -- 10.9 Estimations Based on Taylor’s Equation -- 10.10 Monte Carlo Models -- 10.11 Instantaneous Point Sources -- 10.12
Problems -- Appendix A. Derivation of the Tubulent Energy Equations -- A.1 Equations for the Instantaneous Energy -- A.2 The Equation of Mean Internal Energy -- A.3 The Mean Total Kinetic Energy Equation -- A.4 The Equation for the
Energy of Mean Motion -- A.5 The Turbulent Kinetic Energy Equation -- Appendix B. Dimensional Analysis and Scaling Principles -- B.1 Checking Equations for Errors -- B.2 Inferring an Unknown Relationship -- B.3 Turkey Eggs, Anybody? --
B.4 Problems -- Appendix C. Matching Theory and the PBL Resistance Laws -- Appendix D. Description of the Planetary Boundary Layer Simulation Model -- D.1 Architecture of the Model -- D.2 Surface Boundary Condition -- D.3 The Free
Convection Closure Scheme -- D.4 Treatment of Cloud Formation -- D.5 Treatment of Infrared Radiation -- Appendix E. A Monte Carlo Smoke Plume Simulation -- References
ISBN:9783642604812
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Keywords: Physics , Geophysics , Atmospheric sciences , Continuum physics , Fluids , Thermodynamics , Fluid mechanics , Physics , Classical Continuum Physics , Engineering Fluid Dynamics , Atmospheric Sciences , Fluid- and Aerodynamics , Geophysics/Geodesy , Thermodynamics
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Call number:SPRINGER-1997-9781461206699:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Intelligence, Genes, and Success Scientists Respond to The Bell Curve
Author(s):
Date:1997
Size:1 online resource (376 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-1-4612-0669-9
Contents:I Overview -- 1 Reexamining The Bell Curve -- 2 A Synopsis of The Bell Curve -- II The Genetics—Intelligence Link -- 3 Of Genes and IQ -- 4 The Malleability of Intelligence Is Not Constrained by Heritability -- 5 Racial and Ethnic
Inequalities in Health: Environmental, Psychosocial, and Physiological Pathways -- III Intelligence and the Measurement of IQ -- 6 Theoretical and Technical Issues in Identifying a Factor of General Intelligence -- 7 The Concept and
Utility of Intelligence -- IV Intelligence and Success: Reanalyses of Data from the NLSY -- 8 Cognitive Ability, Wages, and Meritocracy -- 9 The Hidden Gender Restriction: The Need for Proper Controls When Testing for Racial
Discrimination -- 10 Does Staying in School Make You Smarter? The Effect of Education on IQ in The Bell Curve -- 11 Cognitive Ability, Environmental Factors, and Crime: Predicting Frequent Criminal Activity -- 12 Social Statistics and
Genuine Inquiry: Reflections on The Bell Curve -- V The Bell Curve and Public Policy -- 13 A “Head Start” in What Pursuit? IQ Versus Social Competence as the Objective of Early Intervention -- 14 Is There a Cognitive Elite in America?
-- 15 Science, Public Policy, and The Bell Curve -- Contributor Biographies -- Author Index
ISBN:9781461206699
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Keywords: Statistics , Statistics , Statistics for Social Science, Behavorial Science, Education, Public Policy, and , Statistics for Business/Economics/Mathematical Finance/Insurance
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Call number:SPRINGER-1996-9783642976681:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Combustion Physical and Chemical Fundamentals, Modelling and Simulation, Experiments, Pollutant Formation
Author(s): Jürgen Warnatz
Date:1996
Size:1 online resource (265 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-3-642-97668-1
Contents:1 Introduction, Fundamental Definitions and Phenomena -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Some Fundamental Definitions -- 1.3 Basic Flame Types -- 1.4 Exercises -- 2 Experimental Investigation of Flames -- 2.1 Velocity Measurements -- 2.2
Density Measurement -- 2.3 Concentration Measurements -- 2.4 Temperature Measurements -- 2.5 Pressure Measurements -- 2.6 Measurement of Particle Sizes -- 2.7 Exercises -- 3 Mathematical Description of Laminar Flat Premixed Flames --
3.1 Conservation Equations for Laminar Flat Premixed Flames -- 3.2 Heat and Mass Transport -- 3.3 The Description of a Laminar Premixed Flat Flame Front -- 3.4 Exercises -- 4 Thermodynamics of Combustion Processes -- 4.1 The First Law
of Thermodynamics -- 4.2 Standard Enthalpies of Formation -- 4.3 Heat Capacities -- 4.4 The Second Law of Thermodynamics -- 4.5 The Third Law of Thermodynamics -- 4.6 Equilibrium Criteria and Thermodynamic Variables -- 4.7 Equilibrium
in Gas Mixtures Chemical Potential -- 4.8 Determination of Equilibrium Compositions in Gases -- 4.9 Determination of Adiabatic Flame Temperatures -- 4.10 Tabulation of Thermodynamic Data -- 4.11 Exercises -- 5 Transport Phenomena --
5.1 A Simple Physical Model of the Transport Processes -- 5.2 Heat Conduction in Gases -- 5.3 Viscosity of Gases -- 5.4 Diffusion in Gases -- 5.5 Thermal Diffusion, Dufour-Effect, and Pressure Diffusion -- 5.6 Comparison with
Experiments -- 5.7 Exercises -- 6 Chemical Kinetics -- 6.1 Rate Laws and Reaction Orders -- 6.2 Relation of Forward and Reverse Reactions -- 6.3 Elementary Reactions, Reaction Molecularity -- 6.4 Experimental Investigation of
Elementary Reactions -- 6.5 Temperature Dependence of Rate Coefficients -- 6.6 Pressure Dependence of Rate Coefficients -- 6.7 Surface Reactions -- 6.8 Exercises -- 7. Reaction Mechanisms -- 7.1 Characteristics of Reaction Mechanisms
-- 7.2 Analysis of Reaction Mechanisms -- 7.3 Stiffness of Ordinary Differential Equation Systems -- 7.4 Simplification of Reaction Mechanisms -- 7.5 Radical Chain Reactions -- 7.6 Exercises -- 8 Laminar Premixed Flames -- 8.1
Zeldovich’s Analysis of Flame Propagation -- 8.2 Numerical Solution of the Conservation Equations -- 8.3 Flame Structures -- 8.4 Flame Velocities -- 8.5 Sensitivity Analysis -- 8.6 Exercises -- 9 Laminar Nonpremixed Flames -- 9.1
Coimterflow Nonpremixed Flames -- 9.2 Laminar Jet Nonpremixed Flames -- 9.3 Nonpremixed Flames With Fast Chemistry -- 9.4 Exercises -- 10 Ignition Processes -- 10.1 Semenov’s Analysis of Thermal Explosions -- 10.2 Frank-Kamenetskifs
Analysis of Thermal Explosions -- 10.3 Autoignition: Ignition Limits -- 10.4 Autoignition: Ignition-Delay Time -- 10.5 Induced Ignition, Minimum Ignition Energies -- 10.6 Spark Ignition -- 10.7 Detonations -- 10.8 Exercises -- 11 The
Navier-Stokes-Equations for Three-Dimensional Reacting Flows -- 11.1 The Conservation Equations -- 11.2 The Empirical Laws -- 11.3 Appendix: Some Definitions and Laws from Vector- and Tensor-Analysis -- 11.4 Exercises -- 12 Turbulent
Reacting Flows -- 12.1 Some Fundamental Phenomena -- 12.2 Direct Numerical Simulation -- 12.3 Concepts for Turbulence Modeling: Probability Density Functions (PDFs) -- 12.4 Concepts for Turbulence Modeling: Time- and Favre-Averaging --
12.5 Averaged Conservation Equations -- 12.6 Turbulence Models -- 12.7 Mean Reaction Rates -- 12.8 Eddy-Break-Up-Models -- 12.9 Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) -- 12.10 Turbulent Scales -- 12.11 Exercises -- 13 Turbulent Nonpremixed Flames
-- 13.1 Nonpremixed Flames with Equilibrium Chemistry -- 13.2 Finite-Rate Chemistry in Nonpremixed Flames -- 13.3 Flame Extinction -- 13.4 PDF-Simulations of Turbulent Non-Premixed Flames -- 13.5 Exercises -- 14 Turbulent Premixed
Flames -- 14.1 Classification of Turbulent Premixed Flames -- 14.2 Flamelet Models -- 14.3 Turbulent Flame Velocity -- 14.4 Flame Extinction -- 14.5 Other Models of Turbulent Premixed Combustion -- 14.6 Exercises -- 15 Combustion of
Liquid and Solid Fuels -- 15.1 Droplet and Spray Combustion -- 15.2 Coal Combustion -- 16 Engine Knock -- 16.1 Fundamental Phenomena -- 16.2 High Temperature Oxidation -- 16.3 Low Temperature Oxidation -- 16.4 Knock Damages -- 16.5
Exercises -- 17 Formation of Nitric Oxides -- 17.1 Thermal NO (Zeldovich-NO) -- 17.2 Prompt NO (Fenimore-NO) -- 17.3 NO Generated via Nitrous Oxide -- 17.4 Conversion of Fuel Nitrogen into NO -- 17.5 NO Reduction by Primary Methods --
17.6 NO-Reduction by Secondary Methods -- 18 Formation of Hydrocarbons and Soot -- 18.1 Unburnt Hydrocarbons -- 18.2 Formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) -- 18.3 The Phenomenology of Soot Formation -- 18.4 Modelling and
Simulation of Soot Formation -- 19 References -- 20 Keyword Index
ISBN:9783642976681
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Keywords: Physics , Physical chemistry , Fluids , Thermodynamics , Air pollution , Physics , Thermodynamics , Physical Chemistry , Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution , Fluid- and Aerodynamics , Environmental Monitoring/Analysis
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Call number:SPRINGER-1994-9783642579202:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Techniques for Nuclear and Particle Physics Experiments A How-to Approach
Author(s): William R Leo
Date:1994
Edition:Second Revised Edition
Size:1 online resource (382 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-3-642-57920-2
Contents:1. Basic Nuclear Processes in Radioactive Sources -- 1.1 Nuclear Level Diagrams -- 1.2 Alpha Decay -- 1.3 Beta Decay -- 1.4 Electron Capture (EC) -- 1.5 Gamma Emission -- 1.5.1 Isomeric States -- 1.6 Annihilation Radiation -- 1.7
Internal Conversion -- 1.8 Auger Electrons -- 1.9 Neutron Sources -- 1.9.1 Spontaneous Fission -- 1.9.2 Nuclear Reactions -- 1.10 Source Activity Units -- 1.11 The Radioactive Decay Law -- 1.11.1 Fluctuations in Radioactive Decay --
1.11.2 Radioactive Decay Chains -- 1.11.3 Radioisotope Production by Irradiation -- 2. Passage of Radiation Through Matter -- 2.1 Preliminary Notions and Definitions -- 2.1.1 The Cross Section -- 2.1.2 Interaction Probability in a
Distance x. Mean Free Path -- 2.1.3 Surface Density Units -- 2.2 Energy Loss of Heavy Charged Particles by Atomic Collisions -- 2.2.1 Bohr’s Calculation — The Classical Case -- 2.2.2 The Bethe-Bloch Formula -- 2.2.3 Energy Dependence
-- 2.2.4 Scaling Laws for dE/dx -- 2.2.5 Mass Stopping Power -- 2.2.6 dE/dx for Mixtures and Compounds -- 2.2.7 Limitations of the Bethe-Bloch Formula and Other Effects -- 2.2.8 Channeling -- 2.2.9 Range -- 2.3 Cherenkov Radiation --
2.4 Energy Loss of Electrons and Positrons -- 2.4.1 Collision Loss -- 2.4.2 Energy Loss by Radiation: Bremsstrahlung -- 2.4.3 Electron-Electron Bremsstrahlung -- 2.4.4 Critical Energy -- 2.4.5 Radiation Length -- 2.4.6 Range of
Electrons -- 2.4.7 The Absorption of ? Electrons -- 2.5 Multiple Coulomb Scattering -- 2.5.1 Multiple Scattering in the Gaussian Approximation -- 2.5.2 Backscattering of Low-Energy Electrons -- 2.6 Energy Straggling: The Energy Loss
Distribution -- 2.6.1 Thick Absorbers: The Gaussian Limit -- 2.6.2 Very Thick Absorbers -- 2.6.3 Thin Absorbers: The Landau and Vavilov Theories -- 2.7 The Interaction of Photons -- 2.7.1 Photoelectric Effect -- 2.7.2 Compton
Scattering -- 2.7.3 Pair Production -- 2.7.4 Electron-Photon Showers -- 2.7.5 The Total Absorption Coefficient and Photon Attenuation -- 2.8 The Interaction of Neutrons -- 2.8.1 Slowing Down of Neutrons. Moderation -- 3. Radiation
Protection. Biological Effects of Radiation -- 3.1 Dosimetric Units -- 3.1.1 The Roentgen -- 3.1.2 Absorbed Dose -- 3.1.3 Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) -- 3.1.4 Equivalent Dose -- 3.1.5 Effective Dose -- 3.2 Typical Doses
from Sources in the Environment -- 3.3 Biological Effects -- 3.3.1 High Doses Received in a Short Time -- 3.3.2 Low-Level Doses -- 3.4 Dose Limits -- 3.5 Shielding -- 3.6 Radiation Safety in the Nuclear Physics Laboratory -- 4.
Statistics and the Treatment of Experimental Data -- 4.1 Characteristics of Probability Distributions -- 4.1.1 Cumulative Distributions -- 4.1.2 Expectation Values -- 4.1.3 Distribution Moments. The Mean and Variance -- 4.1.4 The
Covariance -- 4.2 Some Common Probability Distributions -- 4.2.1 The Binomial Distribution -- 4.2.2 The Poisson Distribution -- 4.2.3 The Gaussian or Normal Distribution -- 4.2.4 The Chi-Square Distribution -- 4.3 Measurement Errors
and the Measurement Process -- 4.3.1 Systematic Errors -- 4.3.2 Random Errors -- 4.4 Sampling and Parameter Estimation. The Maximum Likelihood Method -- 4.4.1 Sample Moments -- 4.4.2 The Maximum Likelihood Method -- 4.4.3 Estimator for
the Poisson Distribution -- 4.4.4 Estimators for the Gaussian Distribution -- 4.4.5 The Weighted Mean -- 4.5 Examples of Applications -- 4.5.1 Mean and Error from a Series of Measurements -- 4.5.2 Combining Data with Different Errors
-- 4.5.3 Determination of Count Rates and Their Errors -- 4.5.4 Null Experiments. Setting Confidence Limits When No Counts Are Observed -- 4.5.5 Distribution of Time Intervals Between Counts -- 4.6 Propagation of Errors -- 4.6.1
Examples -- 4.7 Curve Fitting -- 4.7.1 The Least Squares Method -- 4.7.2 Linear Fits. The Straight Line -- 4.7.3 Linear Fits When Both Variables Have Errors -- 4.7.4 Nonlinear Fits -- 4.8 Some General Rules for Rounding-off Numbers for
Final Presentation -- 5. General Characteristics of Detectors -- 5.1 Sensitivity -- 5.2 Detector Response -- 5.3 Energy Resolution. The Fano Factor -- 5.4 The Response Function -- 5.5 Response Time -- 5.6 Detector Efficiency -- 5.7
Dead Time -- 5.7.1 Measuring Dead Time -- 6. Ionization Detectors -- 6.1 Gaseous Ionization Detectors -- 6.2 Ionization and Transport Phenomena in Gases -- 6.2.1 Ionization Mechanisms -- 6.2.2 Mean Number of Electron-Ion Pairs Created
-- 6.2.3 Recombination and Electron Attachment -- 6.3 Transport of Electrons and Ions in Gases -- 6.3.1 Diffusion -- 6.3.2 Drift and Mobility -- 6.4 Avalanche Multiplication -- 6.5 The Cylindrical Proportional Counter -- 6.5.1 Pulse
Formation and Shape -- 6.5.2 Choice of Fill Gas -- 6.6 The Multiwire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) -- 6.6.1 Basic Operating Principle -- 6.6.2 Construction -- 6.6.3 Chamber Gas -- 6.6.4 Timing Resolution -- 6.6.5 Readout Methods -- 6.6.6
Track Clusters -- 6.6.7 MWPC Efficiency -- 6.7 The Drift Chamber -- 6.7.1 Drift Gases -- 6.7.2 Spatial Resolution -- 6.7.3 Operation in Magnetic Fields -- 6.8 The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) -- 6.9 Liquid Ionization Detectors (LID)
-- 7. Scintillation Detectors -- 7.1 General Characteristics -- 7.2 Organic Scintillators -- 7.2.1 Organic Crystals -- 7.2.2 Organic Liquids -- 7.2.3 Plastics -- 7.3 Inorganic Crystals -- 7.4 Gaseous Scintillators -- 7.5 Glasses -- 7.6
Light Output Response -- 7.6.1 Linearity -- 7.6.2 Temperature Dependence -- 7.6.3 Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) -- 7.7 Intrinsic Detection Efficiency for Various Radiations -- 7.7.1 Heavy Ions -- 7.7.2 Electrons -- 7.7.3 Gamma Rays
-- 7.7.4 Neutrons -- 8. Photomultipliers -- 8.1 Basic Construction and Operation -- 8.2 The Photocathode -- 8.3 The Electron-Optical Input System -- 8.4 The Electron-Multiplier Section -- 8.4.1 Dynode Configurations -- 8.4.2 Multiplier
Response: The Single-Electron Spectrum -- 8.5 Operating Parameters -- 8.5.1 Gain and Voltage Supply -- 8.5.2 Voltage Dividers -- 8.5.3 Electrode Current. Linearity -- 8.5.4 Pulse Shape -- 8.6 Time Response and Resolution -- 8.7 Noise
-- 8.7.1 Dark Current and Afterpulsing -- 8.7.2 Statistical Noise -- 8.8 Environmental Factors -- 8.8.1 Exposure to Ambient Light -- 8.8.2 Magnetic Fields -- 8.8.3 Temperature Effects -- 8.9 Gain Stability, Count Rate Shift -- 9.
Scintillation Detector Mounting and Operation -- 9.1 Light Collection -- 9.1.1 Reflection -- 9.2 Coupling to the PM -- 9.3 Multiple Photomultipliers -- 9.4 Light Guides -- 9.5 Fluorescent Radiation Converters -- 9.6 Mounting a
Scintillation Detector: An Example -- 9.7 Scintillation Counter Operation -- 9.7.1 Testing the Counter -- 9.7.2 Adjusting the PM Voltage -- 9.7.3 The Scintillation Counter Plateau -- 9.7.4 Maintaining PM Gain -- 10. Semiconductor
Detectors -- 10.1 Basic Semiconductor Properties -- 10.1.1 Energy Band Structure -- 10.1.2 Charge Carriers in Semiconductors -- 10.1.3 Intrinsic Charge Carrier Concentration -- 10.1.4 Mobility -- 10.1.5 Recombination and Trapping --
10.2 Doped Semiconductors -- 10.2.1 Compensation -- 10.3 The np Semiconductor Junction. Depletion Depth -- 10.3.1 The Depletion Depth -- 10.3.2 Junction Capacitance -- 10.3.3 Reversed Bias Junctions -- 10.4 Detector Characteristics of
Semiconductors -- 10.4.1 Average Energy per Electron-Hole Pair -- 10.4.2 Linearity -- 10.4.3 The Fano Factor and Intrinsic Energy Resolution -- 10.4.4 Leakage Current -- 10.4.5 Sensitivity and Intrinsic Efficiency -- 10.4.6 Pulse
Shape. Rise Time -- 10.5 Silicon Diode Detectors -- 10.5.1 Diffused Junction Diodes -- 10.5.2 Surface Barrier Detectors (SSB) -- 10.5.3 Ion-Implanted Diodes -- 10.5.4 Lithium-Drifted Silicon Diodes — Si(Li) -- 10.6 Position-Sensitive
Detectors -- 10.6.1 Continuous and Discrete Detectors -- 10.6.2 Micro-Strip Detectors -- 10.6.3 Novel Position-Sensing Detectors -- 10.7 Germanium Detectors -- 10.7.1 Lithium-Drifted Germanium — Ge(Li) -- 10.7.2 Intrinsic Germanium --
10.7.3 Gamma Spectroscopy with Germanium Detectors -- 10.8 Other Semiconductor Materials -- 10.9 Operation of Semiconductor Detectors -- 10.9.1 Bias Voltage -- 10.9.2 Signal Amplification -- 10.9.3 Temperature Effects -- 10.9.4
Radiation Damage -- 10.9.5 Plasma Effects -- 11. Pulse Signals in Nuclear Electronics -- 11.1 Pulse Signal Terminology -- 11.2 Analog and Digital Signals -- 11.3 Fast and Slow Signals -- 11.4 The Frequency Domain. Bandwidth -- 12. The
NIM Standard -- 12.1 Modules -- 12.2 Power Bins -- 12.3 NIM Logic Signals -- 12.4 TTL and ECL Logic Signals -- 12.5 Analog Signals -- 13. Signal Transmission -- 13.1 Coaxial Cables -- 13.1.1 Line Constituents -- 13.2 The General Wave
Equation for a Coaxial Line -- 13.3 The Ideal Lossless Cable -- 13.3.1 Characteristic Impedance -- 13.4 Reflections -- 13.5 Cable Termination. Impedance Matching -- 13.6 Losses in Coaxial Cables. Pulse Distortion -- 13.6.1 Cable
Response. Pulse Distortion -- 14. Electronics for Pulse Signal Processing -- 14.1 Preamplifiers -- 14.1.1 Resistive vs Optical Feedback -- 14.2 Main Amplifiers -- 14.3 Pulse Shaping Networks in Amplifiers -- 14.3.1 CR-RC Pulse Shaping
-- 14.3.2 Pole-Zero Cancellation and Baseline Restoration -- 14.3.3 Double Differentiation or CR-RC-CR Shaping -- 14.3.4 Semi-Gaussian Shaping -- 14.3.5 Delay Line Shaping -- 14.4 Biased Amplifiers -- 14.5 Pulse Stretchers -- 14.6
Linear Transmission Gate -- 14.7 Fan-out and Fan-in -- 14.8 Delay Lines -- 14.9 Discriminators -- 14.9.1 Shapers -- 14.10 Single-Channel Analyzer (Differential Discriminator) -- 14.11 Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADC or A/D) --
14.11.1 ADC Linearity -- 14.12 Multichannel Analyzers -- 14.13 Digital-to-Analog Converters (DAC or D/A) -- 14.14 Time to Amplitude Converters (TAC or TPHC) -- 14.15 Scalers -- 14.16 Ratemeter -- 14.17 Coincidence Units -- 14.18
Majority Logic Units -- 14.19 Flip-Flops -- 14.20 Registers (Latches) -- 14.21 Gate and Delay Generators -- 14.22 Some Simple and Handy Circuits for Pulse Manipulation -- 14.22.1 Attenuators -- 14.22.2 Pulse Splitting -- 14.22.3
ISBN:9783642579202
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Keywords: Physics , Nuclear physics , Engineering , Physics , Particle and Nuclear Physics , Engineering, general
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Call number:SPRINGER-1992-9784431681892:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Global Interdependence Simulation and Gaming Perspectives Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference of the International Simulation and Gaming Association (ISAGA) Kyoto, Japan: 15–19 July 1991
Author(s):
Date:1992
Size:1 online resource (341 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-4-431-68189-2
Contents:Section 1 Professional and Methodological Issues -- Preparing the Gaming Profession to Deal with Problems of the Twenty-first Century -- Applying Principles of Graphic Design to Game Design -- A Global Model of Simulation and Game
Evaluation -- Information Technology and Simulation Games -- Towards a Concept of Meta-Game: Some Applied Results -- Software to Communicate Global Models -- Modeling Organizations with Visual Agents -- Future Perspectives for Global
Modeling -- Behavioral/Social System Simulation -- Section 2 Communication and Culture -- Communication and Understanding Around the World -- Synchrony in Intercultural Communication -- Global Network Simulation: An Environment for
Global Awareness -- Global University for Global Peace Gaming -- Establishing Cross-Cultural Connections in the Classroom -- Collaborative Creation of Adventure Games in the ESL One-Computer Classroom -- Chinese Word Games for School
Children -- Simulation/Gaming for Language Learning in China -- Training International Commercial Negotiators Through Simulation -- Global Modelling: A Game-Generating Game -- Simulation Structure and Attitude Change in a High
Technology Culture -- Section 3 Environmental and Developmental Issues -- Introducing Gaming-Simulations into the Planning Process in a Developing Country -- The NEW COMMONS GAME -- Asian Agriculture: A Tragedy of the Commons in the
Making? -- Three Simulation/Games and Their Impact on Participants -- Global Change and the Cross-Cultural Transfer of Policy Games -- Policy Exercises on Global Environmental Problems -- An Open Simulation-Game with a TV Studio as a
Tool for Long-Term Policy Formation -- A Computer-Supported Meeting Environment for Policy Exercises -- Municipal Planning Room for Policy Exercises -- Space Influences on Earth’s Ecological and Economic Systems -- Section 4 Economics
and Business -- Global Changes in Business and Economics -- An Econometric Simulation Model: The Case of FUGI/MS -- Managing Post-Communist Economy: A Gaming/Simulation Study -- Strategic Decision Making in Business Gaming --
Management Games in the International Business Classroom -- Business and Engineering Gaming in the Ukraine -- Stock Market Simulation -- Using Spreadsheets for Complex Business Simulations -- A Holistic Approach to Using a Marketing
Strategy Simulation -- Simulation Gaming and the Improvement of Quality -- Section 5 Assembled Abstracts -- Building More Meaning into the Organizational Modeling Process -- Organizational Modeling: Rationales, Issues, and Methods --
Using a Simulation Tool for Defining Global Problems -- A Proposal for the Development of an International Business Simulation Laboratory -- Law, Contract, and Power -- Design of a Computer Game for Managing an Apparel Retail Store --
A Micro World for Kanji Learning -- Game Paradigm CAI -- Residents’ Attitude Shifts in an Environmental Dispute: A Case Study on a Golf Course Location Dispute -- Future Status of Airborne Infectious Diseases: Evolution and Eradication
-- Development of a Game-Wise CAI and the Prerequisites -- Heat Trap: Methodological Considerations for a Policy Exercise on Greenhouse Gas Emissions -- History Education and the Use of Simulation/Games -- Modeling and Managing a Top
Management Game by an Expert System Tool -- Differences that Make a Difference: Intercultural Communication, Simulation, and the Debriefing Process -- Capturing Organizational Knowledge Through Modeling -- Modeling and Diagnosing a
Misconception by Hypothesis-Based Reasoning for ITS -- On Problem Solving and Decision Making of MUSAS, a Musical Arrangement System -- Simulation of Polarization from Each Group Decision -- Gaming/Simulation for Research into Road
Pricing -- A Simulation Based on a Self-Referential Model of Organizational Intelligence -- Business Games in Managerial Training/Development and the Transition to a Free Market Economy -- A Simplified Simulation Model for Country Risk
Evaluation -- Analysis and Simulation of Credential Competition -- Strategy Formation in Universities: Changing Strategic Decision Processes of Loosely Coupled Systems Through Information Technologies -- Concept Formation Model of the
Shape of Two-Dimensional Multimodal Functions and Its Application to Optimization -- A Classroom Simulator for Computer Language Education -- One Step Beyond: Problems with Traditional Game Evaluation -- Automating Model Formulation
for Decision Support -- A Simulation Approach to Process Modeling in Information Systems Analysis and Design
ISBN:9784431681892
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Keywords: Mathematics , Game theory , Economic theory , Mathematics , Game Theory, Economics, Social and Behav. Sciences , Economic Theory/Quantitative Economics/Mathematical Methods
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Call number:SPRINGER-1990-9789400921313:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Ocean Resources Volume I: Assessment and Utilisation
Author(s):
Date:1990
Size:1 online resource (330 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-94-009-2131-3
Contents:I Legal Regime -- 1 The Impact of the Law of the Sea on Ocean Resource Development and Ocean Resource Technology -- II Geological Assessment -- 2 The US EEZ Program: Information and Technology Needs -- 3 The Potential Resources of the
Sea Areas around the Remaining Dependencies of the United Kingdom -- 4 Investigating France’s EEZ: Mapping and Technology -- 5 Development of the Gloria System for More Effective EEZ Reconnaissance -- 6 Efficient Hydrographic Surveying
of EEZ with New Multibeam Echosounder Technology for Shallow and Deep Water -- 7 Engineering Solutions for Deepwater Foundation Problems Using Integrated Investigations -- III Geological Utilization -- 8 Overview of Mineral Resources
in the EEZ -- 9 The Assessment of Aggregate Resources from the U.K. Continental Shelf -- 10 Exploitation of Marine Aggregates and Calcareous Sands -- 11 Mapping, Evaluation and Exploitation of Resources and Conditions in Danish
Domestic Waters -- 12 The Baltic Marine Environment as a Source of Aggregates, and as a Recipient of Dredged Material -- 13 A Case Study of the Minerals on the Seabed of the West Coast of India -- IV Ocean Renewable Energy -- 14
Renewable Energy from the Ocean -- 15 Wave Energy Technology Assessment -- 16 OTEC Developments Out of Europe -- 17 Energy from the Oceans: A mall Land Based Ocean Thermal Energy Plant -- 18 A Status Assessment of OTEC Technology -- V
Living Resources -- 19 Living Marine Resources, Technology and the Extended Economic Zone -- 20 Fisheries Acoustics: Assessment of Fish Stocks and Observation of Fish Behaviour -- VI Space Utilization and Opportunities -- 21 The Ocean
Enterprise Concept -- 22 Future Ocean Space Utilization in Japan -- 23 The Use of the Environment in the Design of Deep Ocean Water Resource Systems -- VII Environmental Assessment -- 24 Obtaining Past Trends in Marine Environmental
Conditions with Contemporary Data -- 25 Potential Use of Circulation/Pollutant Transport Models for Impact Assessment on the U.S. EEZ -- 26 Environmental Assessment for Exclusive Economic Zone Mineral Development Activities: The
Lessons Learned from Offshore Oil and Gas Development
ISBN:9789400921313
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Keywords: Physics , Hydrogeology , Oceanography , Aquatic ecology , Geophysics , Physics , Geophysics and Environmental Physics , Hydrogeology , Oceanography , Freshwater & Marine Ecology
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Call number:SPRINGER-1986-9789400947382:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:The Role of Air-Sea Exchange in Geochemical Cycling
Author(s):
Date:1986
Size:1 online resource (568 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-94-009-4738-2
Contents:Basic Concepts In Geochemical Modelling -- 1. Introduction -- 2.First Order Models -- 2.1. First order decay reaction -- 2.2. Instantaneous perturbation in a first order decay model -- 2.3. First order production model -- 3.
Heterogeneous Catalysis and Enzymatic Type Reactions -- 4. Reversible Reactions -- 5. Model with Coupled Components in the Reservoir -- 6. Second Order Reactions -- 7. Periodic Fluctuations -- 8. Coupling of Reservoirs -- 9.
Conclusions -- Atmospheric Pathways to the Oceans -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Atmospheric Structure and Transports -- 2.1. Boundary layer -- 2.2. Cloud scale transport -- 2.3. Storms and midlatitude circulation -- 2.4. Global scale
exchange -- 3. Variability and Representativeness -- 3.1. Seasonal and interannual variability -- 3.2. Representativeness of observations -- 4. Modeling of Atmospheric Transport -- 4.1. Source identification models -- 4.2. Mechanistic
models -- 4.3. Tropospheric chemistry system models -- Modeling Oceanic Transport of Dissolved Constituents -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Box Models -- 3. Advection-Diffusion Models -- 4. Equations of Motion -- 5. Conclusion -- Vertical
Transport of Particles within the Ocean -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Determination of the Lognormal Coefficients L, ? and of N -- 2.1. Particle size data collection -- 2.2. Calculation of the coefficients L, ? and N from data -- 3.
Determination of Suspended Particulate Matter Physical Properties using Lognormal coefficients -- 3.1. Surface area concentration -- 3.2. Mass concentration -- 3.3. Vertical fluxes -- 3.4. Residence time -- 3.5. Application to the open
sea -- 4. Suspended Particulate Matter Sedimentation with Dissolution Process -- 4.1. Sedimentation at steady state -- 4.2. Sedimentation at non steady state -- 5. Conclusion -- 6. Appendix -- 6.1. Specific properties of the lognormal
law -- 6.2. Evaluation of the lognormal coefficients -- Air-Sea Gas Exchange Rates: Introduction and Synthesis -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Basic Principles -- 3. Models -- 3.1. Film model -- 3.2. Surface renewal models -- 3.3.
Boundary-layer models -- 4. Laboratory (Wind Tunnel) Studies -- 4.1. Smooth surface regime -- 4.2. Rough surface regime -- 4.3. Breaking wave (bubble) regime -- 5. Field Measurements -- 5.1. Box method -- 5.2. Dissolved gas balance
method -- 5.3. Micrometeorological techniques -- 5.4. Natural and bomb-produced 14C -- 5.5. The radon deficiency method -- 5.6. Sulphur hexafluoride -- 5.7. Summary -- 6. Synthesis -- 6.1. Comparison with field data -- The Ocean as a
Source for Atmospheric Particles -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The ? ?E/?r Model -- 3. The ? ?2E/?t ?r Model -- 4. Comparison of ? ?E/?r and W ?2E/?t ?r Models -- 5. Oceanic Whitecap Coverage -- 6. Global Sea-to-Air Salt Flux -- 7. Toward a
Comprehensive Marine Aerosol Generation Model -- The Ocean as a Sink for Atmospheric Particles -- 1. Overview -- 2. Assessement of Wet Deposition -- 3. Field Approach to Dry Deposition -- 4. Accurate Deposition Measurements do not
Guarantee Accurate Net Air to Sea Transfer Rates -- 5. Relative Importance of Wet and Dry Removal Rates -- 6. Conclusion -- Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Interfacial Photochemistry as Factors Influencing Air-Sea Exchange Fluxes and
Processes -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Environmental Photochemistry -- 2.1. Stratospheric photochemistry -- 2.2. Homogeneous tropospheric photochemistry -- 2.3. Heterogeneous tropospheric photochemistry -- 2.4. Seawater photochemistry --
2.5. Soil photochemistry -- 3. Interaction of Photochemistry with Air-Sea Exchange Processes -- 3.1. Air-sea gas exchange -- 3.2. Rainout-washout deposition processes -- 3.3. Dry deposition -- 3.4. Marine aerosol generation -- 4.
Summary -- Carbon Dioxide: Its Natural Cycle and Anthropogenic Perturbation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Natural Cycle of Carbon Dioxide -- 2.1. Reservoirs, fluxes, residence times -- 2.2. Air-sea exchange of CO2 -- 2.3. Regional
variability of air-sea fluxes -- 2.4. Marine carbonate chemistry -- 2.5. The oceanic carbon cycle -- 2.6. The cycle of oxygen -- 3. Anthropogenic Increase of Atmospheric CO2 -- 3.1. Observations and airborne fraction -- 3.2. Modelling
the oceanic response to carbon cycle perturbations -- 3.3. CO2 release from the terrestrial biosphere and the “missing CO2 sink” -- 3.4. Scenarios for future CO2 concentrations -- 3.5. Carbone isotope perturbations -- 4. Climatic
Effects of CO2 Increase -- 5. Natural CO2 Variations -- 5.1. Seasonal variations -- 5.2. Correlation with El Ni?o -- 5.3. Glacial/interglacial changes -- CO2 Air-Sea Exchange during Glacial Times: Importance of Deep Sea Circulation
Changes -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Evidence from Polar Ice Cores -- 2.1. Data -- 2.2. Discussion: is the ocean able to absorb the missing CO2? -- 3. Evidence from Deep Sea Sediments -- 3.1. Data -- 3.2. Various hypotheses explaining the
sedimentary record -- 3.3. Cadmium as a proxy-indicator for past phosphate -- 4. Broecker’s two box Model for the CO2 Cycle -- 5. Evidence for Deep Water Circulation during the Last Climatic Cycle -- 5.1. Geochemical basis -- 5.2.
Glacial to interglacial contrasts -- 5.3. Disappearance of North Atlantic Deep Water during the glacial to interglacial transition -- 5.4. Enhanced North Atlantic Deep Wafer formation during the inception of the glaciation -- 6.
Conclusion -- Exchange of CO and H2 between Ocean And Atmosphere -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Determination of the Supersaturation Factors of CO and H2 -- 3. Spatial and Temporal Changes of dissolved CO and H2 -- 4. Processes Sustaining CO
and H2 Concentrations in Surface Water -- 4.1. Production processes -- 4.2. Consumption processes -- 4.3. Transport processes -- 5. Calculation of Fluxes by the “Laminar Film Model” -- 6. Role of Oceans in the budget of atmospheric CO
and H2 -- The Air-Sea Exchange of Low Molecular Weight Halocarbon Gases -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Gases for which the Oceans are a net Source for the Atmosphere -- 2.1. Alkyl (mainly Methyl) halides -- 2.2. Haloforms -- 2.3. Other
organo-halides -- 3. Gases for which the Oceans are a net Sink for the Atmosphere -- 4. Summary -- Sea-Air Exchange of High-Molecular Weight Synthetic Organic Compounds -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Compounds of Interest -- 3.
Sampling/Analytical Aspects of Trace Organics -- 4. Distribution of High Molecular Weight Organics in the Marine Environment -- 4.1. Water and organisms -- 4.2. Atmospheric concentrations -- 4.3. Atmospheric deposition -- 5. Air-Sea
Exchange Mechanisms for Synthetic Organics -- 5.1. Dry deposition -- 5.2. Wet deposition -- 5.3. Adsorption and partitioning in surface waters -- 6. Air-Sea Fluxes in the North Pacific -- 7. Relative Importance of Atmospheric
Deposition to the CHC Cycle -- 8. Summary and Conclusions -- The Ocean as a Source of Atmospheric Sulfur Compounds -- 1. Sources of Sulfur to the Atmosphere: an Overview -- 2. Seaspray and the Production of Aerosol Sulfate -- 3.
Sulfate Reduction by Geological and Biological Processes -- 4. Assimilatory Sulfate Reduction -- 5. Biosynthesis of Dimethylsulfide -- 6. Marine Chemistry and Distribution of Dimethylsulfide -- 7. Estimating the Air/Sea Flux of
Dimethylsulfide -- 8. Chemical Reactions and Transformations of Dimethylsulfide in the Marine Atmosphere -- 9. A Model of the Cycle of Biogenic Sulfur over the Oceans -- 10. Carbonyl Sulfide -- 10.1. Photochemical production of COS --
10.2. Air/Sea exchange of COS -- 11. Formation and Emission of other Sulfur Species: Hydrogen Sulfide, Carbon Disulfide, Methylmercaptan, Dimethyldisulfide etc… -- 11.1. Hydrogen sulfide -- 11.2. Carbon disulfide -- 11.3.
Methylmercaptan, dimethyldisulfide and other sulfur compounds -- 12. Conclusion -- Cycling of Mercury Between the Atmosphere and Oceans -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Global Models -- 3. Physico-Chemical Models -- 4. Atmospheric Hg
Determinations -- 4.1. Total gaseous Hg -- 4.2. Volatile Hg species -- 5. Hg Analysis in Seawater and Rainwater -- 5.1. Reactive and Total Hg -- 5.2. Volatile Hg -- 5.3. Determinations of Hg in rain -- 6. Air-Sea Exchange of Hg -- 6.1.
Preliminary studies -- 6.2. Present status -- 6.3. Summary -- 7. Ocean Sources of Hg -- 7.1. Hg evasion from the Equatorial Pacific Ocean: 1980 -- 7.2. Hg evasion from the Equatorial Pacific Ocean: 1984 -- 8. Hg Deposition to the Sea
Surface -- 8.1. Precipitation -- 8.2. Dry depositional Hg flux to the Equatorial Pacific Ocean -- 8.3. Air-sea exchange in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean -- 8.4. Physico-chemical aspects -- 9. Atmospheric Cycling of Hg over the Oceans:
Global Perspectives -- The Air-Sea Exchange of Particulate Organic Matter: The Sources and Long-Range Transport of Lipids in Aerosols -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1. Background -- 2. Sampling and Analytical Methodology -- 3. Source and
Long-Range Transport Studies -- 3.1. Introduction -- 3.2. North Pacific Trades: Enewetak -- 3.3. South Pacific Westerlies: New Zealand -- 3.4. Short-Range transport: Coastal Peru -- 4. Conclusions -- The Marine Mineral Aerosol -- 1.
Introduction -- 2. The Concept of the Marine Dust Veil -- 3. Sources of Material to the Marine Atmosphere -- 4. The Distribution of Material in the Marine Dust Veil -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.2. The Atlantic Ocean and surrounding waters
-- 4.3. The Mediterranean -- 4.4. The Pacific ocean -- 4.5. The Indian ocean -- 4.6. Summary -- 5. The Composition of Material in the Marine Dust Veil -- 5.1. Introduction -- 5.2. The mineral composition of the marine dust veil -- 5.3.
Chemical chacacteristics of the mineral aerosol -- 6. The Influence of the Marine Dust Veil on Oceanic Cycles -- 6.1. The water column -- 6.2. The sediment column -- 6.3. Summary -- Air to Sea Transfer of Anthropogenic Trace Metals --
1. Introduction -- 2. The Fate of Atmospheric Trace Metals in Ocean Waters -- 2.1. Physical and chemical forms of metals in the atmosphere -- 2.2. Biogeochemical cycling of trace metals in the ocean -- 3. Geographical Variability of
Metal Fluxes from the Atmosphere
ISBN:9789400947382
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Series:NATO ASI Series, Series C: Mathematical and Physical Sciences: 185
Keywords: Earth sciences , Oceanography , Atmospheric sciences , Earth Sciences , Atmospheric Sciences , Oceanography
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Call number:SPRINGER-1983-9789400970755:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Internal Kinematics and Dynamics of Galaxies
Author(s):
Date:1983
Size:1 online resource (432 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-94-009-7075-5
Contents:I. Kinematics of Gas and the Undunderlying Mass Distribution -- Systematics of HII Rotation Curves -- HI Velocity Fields and Rotation Curves -- A High Resolution HI Survey of M31 -- High Velocity HI in the Inner 5 KPC of M31 --
Comparison of Global 21 cm Velocity Profiles with H?, Rotation Curves -- TAURUS — A Wide Field Imaging Fabry-Perot Spectrometer -- HI Observations of the Irregular Galaxy IC 10 -- The Distribution of Molecular Clouds in Spiral Galaxies
-- The CO Rotation Curve of the Milky Way : Accuracy and Implications -- Cold Molecular Material in the Galaxy -- Molecular Clouds in the Galactic Nucleus -- Molecular Clouds in Spiral Galaxies -- CO Observations of M51 -- Gas at Large
Radii -- Rotation Curve and Mass Model for the Edge-on Galaxy NGC 5907 -- Optical Features Associated with the Extended HI Enveloppe of M83 -- M82 — Tilt and Warp of its Principal Plane -- Vertical Motion and the Thickness of HI Disks
Implications For Galactic Mass Models -- Do Spiral Galaxies Have a Variable Disk Thickness? -- Mass Distribution and Dark Halos -- The Origin of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies -- NGC 3992 — A Galaxy Without a Massive Halo -- Groups of
Galaxies and the Missing Mass Problem -- HI Observations of the Interacting Galaxies — VV 371 and VV 329 -- Distribution and Motions of Atomic Hydrogen in Lenticular Galaxies -- Neutral Hydrogen Mapping of three SO Galaxies -- II.
Spiral Structure -- Theory of Spiral Structure -- Quasi-Stationary Spiral Structure in Galaxies -- Dynamical Mechanisms for Discrete Unstable Spiral Modes in Galaxies -- Global Instabilities of a Galaxy Model -- Global Stability
Analysis of an SO Galaxy NGC 3115 -- Spiral Instabilities and Disk Heating -- On the Evolution of Perturbed Gas Disks -- Cloud-Particle Dynamics and Star Formation in Spiral Galaxies -- The Ballistic Particle Model -- Relation Between
Star Formation and Angular Momentum in Spiral Galaxies -- Model Calculations on the Large Scale Distribution of Bubbles in Galaxies -- HI-Shells in M31 -- Selfpropagating Stochastic Star Formation and Spiral Structure -- Velocity
Structures in the Vertical Extensions of Spiral Arms -- Vertical Structure of Spiral Shocks in a Corrugated Galactic Disc -- Recent Taurus Results on H? Velocities in M83 -- Possible Evidence for Lin’s Three-Wave Interaction Mechanism
at Corotation in the Galaxy NGC -- Spectral Analysis of the Luminosity Distribution of Seven Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster -- Fourier Analysis of Spiral Tracers. A Progress Report -- Large Scale Magnetohydrodynamical Considerations in
Spiral Galaxies -- Magnetic Fields and Spiral Structure -- Spiral Structure : Density Waves or Material Arms ? -- Conflicts and Directions in Spiral Structure -- III. Warps -- Theories of Warps -- Galactic Warps in Tilted Halos --
Periodic Orbits and Warps -- IV. Barred Galaxies -- Morphology, Stellar Kinematics and Dynamics of Barred Galaxies -- Disk Stability -- Instabilities of Hot Stellar Discs -- Stabilizing a Cold Disk with a 1/r Force Law -- Numerical
Experiments on the Response Mechanism of Barred Spirals -- Ordered and Semi-Ergodic Motions in Barred Galaxies -- Onset of Stochasticity in Barred Spirals -- Attacking the Problem of a Selfconsistent Bar -- Theoretical Studies of Gas
Flow in Barred Spiral Galaxies -- Periodic Orbits and Gas Flow in Barred Spiral Galaxies -- The Response of the Ensemble of Molecular Clouds to Bar Forcing in a Galaxy Disk -- Gas Flow Models for Barred Spirals -- Photometry,
Kinematics and Dynamics of the Barred Galaxy NGC 5383 -- Kinematics of the Barred Galaxy NGC 1365 -- HI in the Barred Spiral Galaxies NGC 1365 and NGC 1097 -- Observations of the Neutral Hydrogen in the Barred Spiral Galaxies NGC 3992
and NGC 4731 -- The Barred Galaxy NGC 7741 -- Hydrodynamical Models of Offcentered Barred Spirals -- Structure and Dynamics of Magellanic Type Galaxies -- Formation of Rings And Lenses -- Lenses and Low Surface Brightness Disks -- V.
Spheroidal Systems -- Dynamics of Early-Type Galaxies -- Rotational Velocities and Central Velocity Dispersions for a Sample of SO Galaxies -- Models of Ellipticals and Bulges -- The Stability of Axisymmetric Galaxy Models with
Anisotropic Dispersions -- Three-Dimensional Orbits in Triaxial Galaxies -- Scale-Free Models of Elliptical Galaxies -- Axisymmetric Models of Elliptical Galaxies with Anisotropy -- New Phenomena in Triaxial Stellar Systems --
Kinematic Modelling of NGC 3379 -- Interstellar Matter In Elliptical Galaxies -- Sensitive Search for HI in E and SO galaxies -- Neutral Hydrogen Observations of the Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies NGC 185 and NGC 205 -- Extended Gaseous
Emission in Normal Elliptical Galaxies -- Gas and Star Kinematics in Elliptical Galaxies -- Optical Kinematics of Strong Radio Galaxies -- Dust and Gas in Triaxial Galaxies -- VI. Mergers -- Observational Evidence For Mergers -- Taurus
Observations of the Emission-Line Velocity Field of Centaurus A(NGC 5128) -- Kinematics and Evolution of NGC 5128 -- Simulations Of Galaxy Mergers -- On the Formation and Dynamics of Shells around Elliptical Galaxies -- Merger
Cross-Sections of Colliding Galaxies -- Environmental Effects on Galaxies in Clusters -- Collisions and Merging of Disk Galaxies -- Energy Transfer during the Tidal Encounter of Disc Galaxies -- VII. Galaxy Formation -- Dynamics Of
Globular Cluster Systems -- Kinematics of Clusters in M33 -- SO and Smooth-arm Sa’s within the Hubble Sequence -- Is the Hubble Type of a Disk System Essentially Determined by one Parameter : Total Mass ? -- Systematics of
Bulge-to-Disk Ratios -- The Manifold of Elliptical Galaxies -- The Formation Of Galaxies -- What May Superclusters Tell us About Galaxy Formation? -- Thick discs and the Formation of Disc Galaxies -- Galaxy Formation : Some Comparisons
Between Theory And Observation -- Summary : Observational Viewpoint -- Spry : Theoretical Viewpoint -- Name Index -- Object Index
ISBN:9789400970755
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Series:International Astronomical Union/Union Astronomique Internationale, Symposium No. 100 Held in Besançon, France, August 9–13, 1982 : 100
Keywords: Physics , Observations, Astronomical , Astronomy , Physics , Astronomy, Observations and Techniques
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Call number:SPRINGER-1978-9789401168557:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:The Off-Shore Petroleum Resources of South-East Asia Potential Conflict Situations and Related Economic Considerations
Author(s): Corazón Morales Siddayao
Date:1978
Size:1 online resource (225 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-94-011-6855-7
Contents:One: The Demand-Supply Situation -- I. The Value of Petroleum to South-East Asian Economies -- II. The Off-Shore Petroleum Resource Potential of South-East Asia -- Two: Potential Areas of Conflict -- III. Potential Sources of Conflict
and the Law of the Sea Issues -- IV. Actual Territorial Disputes over Potential Off-Shore Petroleum Fields -- V. Potential Conflict Situations Arising from Geological Settings and Environmental Phenomena -- Three: Economic and Policy
Implications -- VI. Some Economic Factors Bearing on the Resolution of Conflicts over Oil Resources -- VII. Conclusions and Policy Implications -- Appendixes -- A U.S. Geological Survey Description of Coastal Categories -- B Proposed
Legal Definitions in the Third Law of the Sea Conference -- C Mathematical Explanation of Welfare Maximization in the Utilization of a Society’s Petroleum Resources
ISBN:9789401168557
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Keywords: Engineering , Renewable energy resources , Geotechnical engineering , Renewable energy sources , Alternate energy sources , Green energy industries , Engineering , Renewable and Green Energy , Geotechnical Engineering & Applied Earth Sciences
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Call number:SPRINGER-1973-9789401025270:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Turbulent Diffusion in the Environment
Author(s): G. T Csanady
Date:1973
Size:1 online resource (249 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-94-010-2527-0
Contents:I. Molecular Diffusion -- 1.1. Introduction -- 1.2. Concentration -- 1.3. Flux -- 1.4. Fick’s Law -- 1.5. Conservation of Mass -- 1.6. Instantaneous Plane Source -- 1.7. Some Simple Examples -- 1.8. Diffusion of Finite Size Cloud --
1.9. ‘Reflection’ at Boundary -- 1.10. Two- and Three-Dimensional Problems -- 1.11. Continuous Sources -- 1.12. Source in Uniform Wind -- Appendix to Chapter I -- Exercises -- References -- II. Statistical Theory of Diffusion and
Brownian Motion -- 2.1. Introduction -- 2.2. Dispersion Through Random Movements -- 2.3. Diffusion with Stationary Velocities -- 2.4. Brownian Motion -- 2.5. Dispersion of Brownian Particles -- 2.6. Simple Random Walk Model -- 2.7.
Reflecting Barrier -- 2.8. Absorbing Barrier -- 2.9. Connection of Random Walk to Diffusion Equation -- 2.10. Deposition on Vertical Surfaces -- 2.11. Deposition on Horizontal Surfaces -- Exercises -- References -- III. Turbulent
Diffusion: Elementary Statistical Theory and Atmospheric Applications -- 3.1. Fundamental Concepts of Turbulence -- 3.2. Field Measurements of Concentration and Dosage -- 3.3. The Statistical Approach to Environmental Diffusion -- 3.4.
‘Lagrangian’ Properties of Turbulence -- 3.5. Consequences of Taylor’s Theorem -- 3.6. The Form of the Particle-Displacement Probability Distribution -- 3.7. Mean Concentration Field of Continuous Sources -- 3.8. Apparent Eddy
Diffusivity -- 3.9. Application to Laboratory Experiments -- 3.10. Application to Atmospheric Diffusion -- 3.11. Initial Phase of Continuous Plumes -- 3.12. Atmospheric Cloud Growth far from Concentrated Sources -- 3.13. The
Non-Stationary Character of Atmospheric Turbulence -- 3.14. The Hay-Pasquill Method of Cloud-Spread Prediction -- Exercise -- References -- IV. ‘Relative’ Diffusion and Oceanic Applications -- 4.1. Experimental Basis -- 4.2. Mean
Concentration Field in a Frame of Reference Attached to the Center of Gravity -- 4.3. Probability Distributions of Particle Displacements -- 4.4. Kinematics of Particle Movements in a Moving Frame -- 4.5. Phases of Cloud Growth -- 4.6.
History of a Concentrated Puff -- 4.7. Initially Finite Size Cloud -- 4.8. Use of the Diffusion Equation -- 4.9. Horizontal Diffusion in the Ocean and Large Lakes -- 4.10. Application to Diffusion of Sewage Plumes -- 4.11. Vertical
Diffusion in Lakes and Oceans -- Exercise -- References -- V. Dispersion in Shear Flow -- 5.1. Introduction -- 5.2. Properties of the Planetary Boundary Layer -- 5.3. Particle Displacements in a Wall Layer -- 5.4. Continuous
Ground-Level Line Source -- 5.5. Flux and Eddy Diffusivity -- 5.6. Comparison with Experiment -- 5.7. Continuous Point Source at Ground Level -- 5.8. Use of the Diffusion Equation -- 5.9. Elevated Sources -- 5.10. Longitudinal
Dispersion in Shear Flow -- 5.11. Shear-Augmented Diffusion in a Channel -- 5.12. Dispersion in Natural Streams -- 5.13. Shear-Augmented Dispersion in Unlimited Parallel Flow -- 5.14. Diffusion in Skewed Shear Flow -- References -- VI.
Effects of Density Differences on Environmental Diffusion -- 6.1. Introduction -- 6.2. Fundamental Equations -- 6.3. Approximate Forms of the Equations -- 6.4. Equations for Turbulent Flow -- 6.5. Turbulent Energy Equation -- 6.6.
Diffusion Floors and Ceilings -- 6.7. Diffusion in a Continuously Stratified Fluid -- 6.8. Velocity Autocorrelation and Particle Spread in Stratified Fluid Model -- 6.9. Bodily Motion of Buoyant and Heavy Plumes -- 6.10. Dynamics of a
Line Thermal -- 6.11. Similarity Theory -- 6.12. Bent-Over Chimney Plumes -- 6.13. Theory of Buoyancy Dominated Plumes in a Neutral Atmosphere -- 6.14. Comparison with Observation -- 6.15. Flow Pattern within a Plume -- 6.16. Effect of
Atmospheric Stratification -- 6.17. Approximate Arguments for Plumes in Stratified Surroundings -- 6.18. Engineering Assessment of Ground Level Pollution from Buoyancy Dominated Plumes -- 6.19. Effects of Plume Rise on Ground-Level
Concentration -- Appendix to Chapter VI -- A6.1. Momentum Plumes -- Exercise -- References -- VII. The Fluctuation Problem in Turbulent Diffusion -- 7.1. Introduction -- 7.2. Probability Distribution of Concentration -- 7.3. The
Functional Form of the Probability Distribution -- 7.4. Hazard Assessment on the Basis of Concentration Probabilities -- 7.5. The Variance of Concentration Fluctuations -- 7.6. Self-Similar Fluctuation Intensity Distribution -- 7.7.
Fluctuating Plume Model -- References
ISBN:9789401025270
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Series:Geophysics and Astrophysics Monographs, An International Series of Fundamental Textbooks : 3
Keywords: Earth sciences , Oceanography , Atmospheric sciences , Earth Sciences , Atmospheric Sciences , Oceanography
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Call number:CRC9781482240597:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Unifying Physics of Accelerators, Lasers and Plasma
Author(s): Andrei Seryi
Date:2016
Edition:
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
Size:288 p
Contents:Mechanics of solids, Bela I. Sandor -- Engineering thermodynamics, Michael J. Moran -- Fluid mechanics, Frank Kreith -- Heat and mass transfer. Frank Kreith -- Electrical engineering, Giorgio Rizzoni -- Human-machine interaction, Thomas B. Sheridan -- Energy resources, D. Yogi Goswami -- Energy conversion, D. Yogi Goswami -- Air-conditioning and refrigeration, Herbert A. Ingley and Shan K. Wang -- Transportation, Frank Kreith -- Engineering design, Ashok V. Kumar -- Materials, Bhuvenesh C. Goswami - - Modern manufacturing, Scott Smith -- Robotics, Frank Lewis -- MEMS technology, Mohamed Gad-el-Hak -- Environmental engineering, Ari Rabl nd Jan F. Kreider -- Engineering economics and project management, Chan S. Park and Donald D. Tippett -- Nanotechno l ogy, Sergey Edward Lyshevski -- Mathematics, William F. Ames and George Cain -- Patent law and miscellaneous topics, Frank Kreith.
ISBN:9781482240597
Series:eBooks
Series:CRCnetBASE
Keywords: Mechanical engineering
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