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SPIRES-BOOKS: FIND KEYWORD FINE ARTS *END*INIT* use /tmp/qspiwww.webspi1/15980.12 QRY 131.225.70.96 . find keyword fine arts ( in books using www Cover
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Call number:SPRINGER-2014-9781461478911:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Exploring Science Through Science Fiction [electronic resource]
Author(s): Barry B Luokkala
Date:2014
Publisher:New York, NY : Springer New York : Imprint: Springer
Size:1 online resource
Note:How does Einsteins description of space and time compare with Dr. Who? Can James Bond really escape from an armor-plated railroad car by cutting through the floor with a laser concealed in a wristwatch? What would it take tocreate a fully-intelligent android, such as Star Treks Commander Data? How might we discover intelligent civilizations on other planets in the galaxy? Is human teleportation possible? Will our technological society ever reach thepoint at which it becomes lawful to discriminate on the basis of genetic information, as in the movie GATTACA? Exploring Science Through Science Fiction addresses these and other interesting questions, using science fiction as aspringboard for discussing fundamental science concepts and cutting-edge scienc e research. The book is designed as a primary text for a college-level course which should appeal to students in the fine arts and humanities as well as toscience and engineering students. It includes references to original research papers, landmark scien tific publications and technical documents, as well as a broad range of science literature at a more popular level. With over 180references to specific scenes in 130 sci-fi movies and TV episodes, spanning over 100 years of cinematic history, it should be an enjoyable read for anyone with an interest in science and science fiction
Contents:Preface
1 Introduction: Discerning the Real, the Possible and the Impossible
2 What is the Nature of Space and Time? (the physics of space travel and time travel)
3 What is the Universe Made of? (matter, energy and interactions)
4 Can a Machine Become Self Aware? (the sciences of computing and cognition)
5 Are We Alone in the Universe? (the search for extraterrestrial intelligence)
6 What does it Mean to be Human? (biological sciences, biotechnology and other considerations)
7 How do We Solve Our Problems? (science, technology and society)
8 What Lies Ahead? (the future
ISBN:9781461478911
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink
Series:Science and Fiction, 2197-1188
Series:Physics and Astronomy (Springer-11651)
Keywords: Life sciences , Astrophysics , Science (General) , Engineering , Materials
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Call number:SPRINGER-2012-9781461409403:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Sketching the Moon [electronic resource]
Author(s): Richard Handy
Deirdre Kelleghan
Thomas McCague
Erika Rix
Sally Russell
Date:2012
Publisher:Springer New York
Size:1 online resource
Note:Popular science
Note:Springer 2012 Physics and Astronomy eBook collection
Note:Springer e-book platform
ISBN:9781461409403
Series:Practical Astronomy
Series:e-books
Keywords: Astronomy, Observations and Techniques , Popular Science in Astronomy , Arts Education , Fine Arts
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Call number:SPRINGER-2011-9783034801393:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Crossroads: History of Science, History of Art [electronic resource] : Essays by David Speiser, vol. II
Author(s): Kim Williams
Date:2011
Publisher:Basel : Springer Basel
Size:1 online resource
Note:Springer e-book platform
Note:Springer 2013 e-book collections
Note:

This collection of essays on relationships between science, history of science, history of art and philosophy is a multi-faceted sequel to the first volume, Discovering the Principles of Mechanics 1600-1800, publishedin 2008. During his car eer, David Speiser was first and foremost a theoretical physicist with first-hand knowledge of how fundamental research is carried out, but he was also a historian of science and editor of historical writings aswell as a keen observer of works of art and architecture. In these essays he compares and contrasts artistic creations with scientific discoveries, the work of the artist and that ofthe scientist, and process of analysis of the arthistorian to that of the historian of science. What is revealed is h ow the limits of individual disciplines can be pushed and sometimes completely overcome as the result of input from and interactions with other fields, and howprogress may even be impossible without such interactions. The reflections elucidated here refut e the idea, so engrained in our thinking today, of the two cultures, and underline the unity rather than the diversity inherent increative thought both scientific and artistic. Contained here are ten papers, all newly edited with updated references, four of which have been translated into English for the first time, and completed with an index of names. Intendedfor the specialist and non-specialist alike, these essays set before us a feast of ideas.

Note:Springer eBooks
Contents:Foreword
Editors Note
The Symmetry of the Ornament on a Jewel of the Treasure of Mycenae
Arab and Pisan Mathematics in the Piazza dei Miracoli
Architecture, Mathematics and Theology in Raphael's Paintings
What can the Historian of Science Learn from the Historian of the Fine Arts?
The Importance of Concepts for Science
Remarks on Space and Time in Newton, Leibniz, Euler and in Modern Physics
Gruppentheorie und Quantenmechanik: The Book and its Position in Weyl's Work
Clifford A. Truesdell's Contributions to the Euler and the Bernoulli Editions
Publishing Complete
ISBN:9783034801393
Series:e-books
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Mathematics and Statistics (Springer-11649)
Keywords: Mathematics , Architecture
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Call number:SPRINGER-2002-9783034881418:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:The Topos of Music Geometric Logic of Concepts, Theory, and Performance
Author(s): Guerino Mazzola
Date:2002
Size:1 online resource (1344 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-3-0348-8141-8
Contents:I Introduction and Orientation -- 1 What is Music About? -- 1.1 Fundamental Activities -- 1.2 Fundamental Scientific Domains -- 2 Topography -- 2.1 Layers of Reality -- 2.1.1 Physical Reality -- 2.1.2 Mental Reality -- 2.1.3
Psychological Reality -- 2.2 Molino’s Communication Stream -- 2.2.1 Creator and Poietic Level -- 2.2.2 Work and Neutral Level -- 2.2.3 Listener and Esthesic Level -- 2.3 Semiosis -- 2.3.1 Expressions -- 2.3.2 Content -- 2.3.3 The
Process of Signification -- 2.3.4 A Short Overview of Music Semiotics -- 2.4 The Cube of Local Topography -- 2.5 Topographical Navigation -- 3 Musical Ontology -- 3.1 Where is Music? -- 3.2 Depth and Complexity -- 4 Models and
Experiments in Musicology -- 4.1 Interior and Exterior Nature -- 4.2 What Is a Musicological Experiment? -- 4.3 Questions—Experiments of the Mind -- 4.4 New Scientific Paradigms and Collaboratories -- II Navigation on Concept Spaces --
5 Navigation -- 5.1 Music in the EncycloSpace -- 5.2 Receptive Navigation -- 5.3 Productive Navigation -- 6 Denotators -- 6.1 Universal Concept Formats -- 6.1.1 First Naive Approach To Denotators -- 6.1.2 Interpretations and Comments
-- 6.1.3 Ordering Denotators and ‘Concept Leafing’ -- 6.2 Forms -- 6.2.1 Variable Addresses -- 6.2.2 Formal Definition -- 6.2.3 Discussion of the Form Typology -- 6.3 Denotators -- 6.3.1 Formal Definition of a Denotator -- 6.4
Anchoring Forms in Modules -- 6.4.1 First Examples and Comments on Modules in Music -- 6.5 Regular and Circular Forms -- 6.6 Regular Denotators -- 6.7 Circular Denotators -- 6.8 Ordering on Forms and Denotators -- 6.8.1 Concretizations
and Applications -- 6.9 Concept Surgery and Denotator Semantics -- III Local Theory -- 7 Local Compositions -- 7.1 The Objects of Local Theory -- 7.2 First Local Music Objects -- 7.2.1 Chords and Scales -- 7.2.2 Local Meters and Local
Rhythms -- 7.2.3 Motives -- 7.3 Functorial Local Compositions -- 7.4 First Elements of Local Theory -- 7.5 Alterations Are Tangents -- 7.5.1 The Theorem of Mason—Mazzola -- 8 Symmetries and Morphisms -- 8.1 Symmetries in Music -- 8.1.1
Elementary Examples -- 8.2 Morphisms of Local Compositions -- 8.3 Categories of Local Compositions -- 8.3.1 Commenting the Concatenation Principle -- 8.3.2 Embedding and Addressed Adjointness -- 8.3.3 Universal Constructions on Local
Compositions -- 8.3.4 The Address Question -- 8.3.5 Categories of Commutative Local Compositions -- 9 Yoneda Perspectives -- 9.1 Morphisms Are Points -- 9.2 Yoneda’s Fundamental Lemma -- 9.3 The Yoneda Philosophy -- 9.4 Understanding
Fine and Other Arts -- 9.4.1 Painting and Music -- 9.4.2 The Art of Object-Oriented Programming -- 10 Paradigmatic Classification -- 10.1 Paradigmata in Musicology, Linguistics, and Mathematics -- 10.2 Transformation -- 10.3 Similarity
-- 10.4 Fuzzy Concepts in the Humanities -- 11 Orbits -- 11.1 Gestalt and Symmetry Groups -- 11.2 The Framework for Local Classification -- 11.3 Orbits of Elementary Structures -- 11.3.1 Classification Techniques -- 11.3.2 The Local
Classification Theorem -- 11.3.3 The Finite Case -- 11.3.4 Dimension -- 11.3.5 Chords -- 11.3.6 Empirical Harmonic Vocabularies -- 11.3.7 Self-addressed Chords -- 11.3.8 Motives -- 11.4 Enumeration Theory -- 11.4.1 Pólya and de Bruijn
Theory -- 11.4.2 Big Science for Big Numbers -- 11.5 Group-theoretical Methods in Composition and Theory -- 11.5.1 Aspects of Serialism -- 11.5.2 The American Tradition -- 11.6 Esthetic Implications of Classification -- 11.6.1
Jakobson’s Poetic Function -- 11.6.2 Motivic Analysis: Schubert/Stolberg “Lied auf dem Wasser zu singen...” -- 11.6.3 Composition: Mazzola/Baudelaire “La mort des artistes” -- 11.7 Mathematical Reflections on Historicity in Music --
11.7.1 Jean-Jacques Nattiez’ Paradigmatic Theme -- 11.7.2 Groups as a Parameter of Historicity -- 12 Topological Specialization -- 12.1 What Ehrenfels Neglected -- 12.2 Topology -- 12.2.1 Metrical Comparison -- 12.2.2 Specialization
Morphisms of Local Compositions -- 12.3 The Problem of Sound Classification -- 12.3.1 Topographic Determinants of Sound Descriptions -- 12.3.2 Varieties of Sounds -- 12.3.3 Semiotics of Sound Classification -- 12.4 Making the Vague
Precise -- IV Global Theory -- 13 Global Compositions -- 13.1 The Local-Global Dichotomy in Music -- 13.1.1 Musical and Mathematical Manifolds -- 13.2 What Are Global Compositions? -- 13.2.1 The Nerve of an Objective Global Composition
-- 13.3 Functorial Global Compositions -- 13.4 Interpretations and the Vocabulary of Global Concepts -- 13.4.1 Iterated Interpretations -- 13.4.2 The Pitch Domain: Chains of Thirds, Ecclesiastical Modes, Triadic and Quaternary Degrees
-- 13.4.3 Interpreting Time: Global Meters and Rhythms -- 13.4.4 Motivic Interpretations: Melodies and Themes -- 14 Global Perspectives -- 14.1 Musical Motivation -- 14.2 Global Morphisms -- 14.3 Local Domains -- 14.4 Nerves -- 14.5
Simplicial Weights -- 14.6 Categories of Commutative Global Compositions -- 15 Global Classification -- 15.1 Module Complexes -- 15.1.1 Global Affine Functions -- 15.1.2 Bilinear and Exterior Forms -- 15.1.3 Deviation: Compositions vs.
“Molecules” -- 15.2 The Resolution of a Global Composition -- 15.2.1 Global Standard Compositions -- 15.2.2 Compositions from Module Complexes -- 15.3 Orbits of Module Complexes Are Classifying -- 15.3.1 Combinatorial Group Actions --
15.3.2 Classifying Spaces -- 16 Classifying Interpretations -- 16.1 Characterization of Interpretable Compositions -- 16.1.1 Automorphism Groups of Interpretable Compositions -- 16.1.2 A Cohomological Criterion -- 16.2 Global
Enumeration Theory -- 16.2.1 Tesselation -- 16.2.2 Mosaics -- 16.2.3 Classifying Rational Rhythms and Canons -- 16.3 Global American Set Theory -- 16.4 Interpretable “Molecules” -- 17 Esthetics and Classification -- 17.1 Understanding
by Resolution: An Illustrative Example -- 17.2 Varese’s Program and Yoneda’s Lemma -- 18 Predicates -- 18.1 What Is the Case: The Existence Problem -- 18.1.1 Merging Systematic and Historical Musicology -- 18.2 Textual and Paratextual
Semiosis -- 18.2.1 Textual and Paratextual Signification -- 18.3 Textuality -- 18.3.1 The Category of Denotators -- 18.3.2 Textual Semiosis -- 18.3.3 Atomic Predicates -- 18.3.4 Logical and Geometric Motivation -- 18.4 Paratextuality
-- 19 Topoi of Music -- 19.1 The Grothendieck Topology -- 19.1.1 Cohomology -- 19.1.2 Marginalia on Presheaves -- 19.2 The Topos of Music: An Overview -- 20 Visualization Principles -- 20.1 Problems -- 20.2 Folding Dimensions -- 20.2.1
?2 ? ? -- 20.2.1 ?n ? ? -- 20.2.3 An Explicit Construction of ? with Special Values -- 20.3 Folding Denotators -- 20.3.1 Folding Limits -- 20.3.2 Folding Colimits -- 20.3.3 Folding Powersets -- 20.3.4 Folding Circular Denotators --
20.4 Compound Parametrized Objects -- 20.5 Examples -- V Topologies for Rhythm and Motives -- 21 Metrics and Rhythmics -- 21.1 Review of Riemann and Jackendoff—Lerdahl Theories -- 21.1.1 Riemann’s Weights -- 21.1.2 Jackendoff—Lerdahl:
Intrinsic Versus Extrinsic Time Structures -- 21.2 Topologies of Global Meters and Associated Weights -- 21.3 Macro-Events in the Time Domain -- 22 Motif Gestalts -- 22.1 Motivic Interpretation -- 22.2 Shape Types -- 22.2.1 Examples of
Shape Types -- 22.3 Metrical Similarity -- 22.3.1 Examples of Distance Functions -- 22.4 Paradigmatic Groups -- 22.4.1 Examples of Paradigmatic Groups -- 22.5 Pseudo-metrics on Orbits -- 22.6 Topologies on Gestalts -- 22.6.1 The
Inheritance Property -- 22.6.2 Cognitive Aspects of Inheritance -- 22.6.3 Epsilon Topologies -- 22.7 First Properties of the Epsilon Topologies -- 22.7.1 Toroidal Topologies -- 22.8 Rudolph Reti’s Motivic Analysis Revisited -- 22.8.1
Review of Concepts -- 22.8.2 Reconstruction -- 22.9 Motivic Weights -- VI Harmony -- 23 Critical Preliminaries -- 23.1 Hugo Riemann -- 23.2 Paul Hindemith -- 23.3 Heinrich Schenker and Friedrich Salzer -- 24 Harmonic Topology -- 24.1
Chord Perspectives -- 24.1.1 Euler Perspectives -- 24.1.2 12-tempered Perspectives -- 24.1.3 Enharmonic Projection -- 24.2 Chord Topologies -- 24.2.1 Extension and Intension -- 24.2.2 Extension and Intension Topologies -- 24.2.3
Faithful Addresses -- 24.2.4 The Saturation Sheaf -- 25 Harmonic Semantics -- 25.1 Harmonic Signs—Overview -- 25.2 Degree Theory -- 25.2.1 Chains of Thirds -- 25.2.2 American Jazz Theory -- 25.2.3 Hans Straub: General Degrees in
General Scales -- 25.3 Function Theory -- 25.3.1 Canonical Morphemes for European Harmony -- 25.3.2 Riemann Matrices -- 25.3.3 Chains of Thirds -- 25.3.4 Tonal Functions from Absorbing Addresses -- 26 Cadence -- 26.1 Making the Concept
Precise -- 26.2 Classical Cadences Relating to 12-tempered Intonation -- 26.2.1 Cadences in Triadic Interpretations of Diatonic Scales -- 26.2.2 Cadences in More General Interpretations -- 26.3 Cadences in Self-addressed Tonalities of
Morphology -- 26.4 Self-addressed Cadences by Symmetries and Morphisms -- 26.5 Cadences for Just Intonation -- 26.5.1 Tonalities in Third-Fifth Intonation -- 26.5.2 Tonalities in Pythagorean Intonation -- 27 Modulation -- 27.1 Modeling
Modulation by Particle Interaction -- 27.1.1 Models and the Anthropic Principle -- 27.1.2 Classical Motivation and Heuristics -- 27.1.3 The General Background -- 27.1.4 The Well-Tempered Case -- 27.1.5 Reconstructing the Diatonic Scale
from Modulation -- 27.1.6 The Case of Just Tuning -- 27.1.7 Quantized Modulations and Modulation Domains for Selected Scales -- 27.2 Harmonic Tension -- 27.2.1 The Riemann Algebra -- 27.2.2 Weights on the Riemann Algebra -- 27.2.3
Harmonic Tensions from Classical Harmony? -- 27.2.4 Optimizing Harmonic Paths -- 28 Applications -- 28.1 First Examples -- 28.1.1 Johann Sebastian Bach: Choral from “Himmelfahrtsoratorium” -- 28.1.2 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart:
“Zauberflöte”, Choir of Priests -- 28.1.3 Claude Debussy: “Préludes”, Livre 1, No.4 -- 28.2 Modulation in Beethoven’s Sonata op.106, 1stMovement --
ISBN:9783034881418
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Keywords: Mathematics , Philosophy and science , Algebraic geometry , Applied mathematics , Engineering mathematics , Visualization , Geometry , Mathematics , Applications of Mathematics , Philosophy of Science , Geometry , Algebraic Geometry , Mathematics, general , Visualization
Availability:Click here to see Library holdings or inquire at Circ Desk (x3401)
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