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SPIRES-BOOKS: FIND KEYWORD GEOECOLOGY *END*INIT* use /tmp/qspiwww.webspi1/19531.11 QRY 131.225.70.96 . find keyword geoecology ( in books using www Cover
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Call number:SPRINGER-1993-9783642501555:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Patch Dynamics
Author(s):
Date:1993
Size:1 online resource (2 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-3-642-50155-5
Contents:Comparing Terrestrial and Marine Ecological Systems -- Summary -- Present Status -- Major Themes -- Present Programs -- Options for Action -- Mechanisms for Action -- II. Methods and Descriptions Overview (Powell) -- 1. Introduction
to Spatial Statistics -- 2. The Spatial Nature of Soil Variability and Its Implications for Field Studies -- 3. Phytoplankton Patchiness: Ecological Implications and Observation Methods -- 4. Measuring the Fate of Patches in the Water:
Larval Dispersal -- 5. Determining Process Through Pattern: Reality or Fantasy? -- 6. Description and Analysis of Spatial Patterns -- III. Concepts and Models Overview (Steele) -- 7. Ecological Interactions in Patchy Environments: From
Patch-Occupancy Models to Cellular Automata -- 8. Spatial Aggregation Arising from Convective Processes -- 9. Two-Patch Metapopulation Dynamics -- 10. Coupling of Circulation and Marine Ecosystem Models -- 11. An Invitation to
Structured (Meta) Population Models -- 12. Stochastic Models of Growth and Competition -- 13. Mechanisms of Patch Formation -- IV. Ecological and Evolutionary Consequences Overview (Levin) -- 14. The Ocean Carbon Cycle and Climate
Change: An Analysis of Interconnected Scales -- 15. Shifting Mosaic Metapopulation Dynamics -- 16. Modeling Fire Regime in Mediterranean Landscapes -- 17. The Influence of Regional Processes on Local Communities: Examples From an
Experimentally Fragmented Landsacape -- 18. Ecological and Evolutionary Consequences of Patchiness: A Marine-Terrestrial Perspective -- Contributors List
ISBN:9783642501555
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Series:Lecture Notes in Biomathematics: 96
Keywords: Life sciences , Geology , Geophysics , Ecology , Geoecology , Environmental geology , Nature conservation , Life Sciences , Ecology , Geology , Geophysics/Geodesy , Geoecology/Natural Processes , Nature Conservation
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Call number:SPRINGER-1991-9783540473749:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Diophantine Approximations and Diophantine Equations
Author(s): Wolfgang M Schmidt
Date:1991
Size:1 online resource (224 p.)
Note:10.1007/BFb0098246
Contents:Siegel’s lemma and heights -- Diophantine approximation -- The thue equation -- S-unit equations and hyperelliptic equations -- Diophantine equations in more than two variables
ISBN:9783540473749
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Series:Lecture Notes in Mathematics: 1467
Keywords: Mathematics , Earth sciences , Number theory , Geoecology , Environmental geology , Mathematics , Number Theory , Geoecology/Natural Processes , Earth Sciences, general
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Call number:SPRINGER-1989-9783642613173:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Applied Mathematical Ecology
Author(s):
Date:1989
Size:1 online resource (491 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-3-642-61317-3
Contents:I. Introduction -- Ecology in Theory and Application -- II. Resource Management -- Bioeconomic Modeling and Resource Management -- Common Property and the Conservation of Natural Resources -- Information and Area-Wide Control in
Agricultural Ecology -- III. Epidemiology -- Fundamental Aspects of Epidemiology -- Three Basic Epidemiological Models -- The Population Biology of Parasitic Helminths in Animal Populations -- Simple Versus Complex Epidemiological
Models -- Periodicity in Epidemiological Models -- Case Studies -- Rubella -- Influenza and Some Related Mathematical Models -- Review of Recent Models of HIV/AIDS Transmission -- The Transmission Dynamics of Human Immunodeficiency
Virus (HIV) -- IV. Ecotoxicology -- Models in Ecotoxicology: Methodological Aspects -- Deterministic and Statistical Models of Chemical Fate in Aquatic Systems -- Effects of Toxicants on Aquatic Populations -- V. Demography and
Population Biology -- Mathematical Models in Plant Biology: An Overview -- Stable Population Theory and Applications -- Stage Structure Models Applied in Evolutionary Ecology -- Some Applications of Structured Models in Population
Dynamics -- Author Index
ISBN:9783642613173
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Series:Biomathematics: 18
Keywords: Mathematics , Immunology , Ecology , Biomathematics , Statistics , Geoecology , Environmental geology , Ecotoxicology , Mathematics , Mathematical and Computational Biology , Ecology , Ecotoxicology , Immunology , Statistics for Life Sciences, Medicine, Health Sciences , Geoecology/Natural Processes
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Call number:SPRINGER-1988-9783642733093:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Biological Coherence and Response to External Stimuli
Author(s):
Date:1988
Size:1 online resource (268 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-3-642-73309-3
Contents:Theoretical Physics and Biology -- Theory of Non-Linear Excitations -- Structures, Correlations and Electromagnetic Interactions in Living Matter: Theory and Applications -- Resonant Cellular Effects of Low Intensity Microwaves -- The
Influence of Low Intensity Millimetre Waves on Biological Systems -- Metastable States of Biopolymers -- Physical Aspects of Plant Photosynthesis -- Emission of Radiation by Active Cells -- Physiological Signalling Across Cell
Membranes and Cooperative Influences of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields -- The Interaction of Living Red Blood Cells -- The Genetic Code as Language -- Electromagnetic Effects in Humans -- Coherent Properties of
Energy-Coupling Membrane Systems -- Coherence in the Cytoskeleton: Implications for Biological Information Processing
ISBN:9783642733093
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Keywords: Physics , Ecology , Zoology , Biophysics , Biological physics , Geoecology , Environmental geology , Nature conservation , Physics , Biophysics and Biological Physics , Zoology , Geoecology/Natural Processes , Nature Conservation , Ecology
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Call number:SPRINGER-1985-9783642954535:ONLINE Show nearby items on shelf
Title:Evolution of Matter and Energy on a Cosmic and Planetary Scale
Author(s): M Taube
Date:1985
Size:1 online resource (289 p.)
Note:10.1007/978-3-642-95453-5
Contents:1 Matter and Energy. The Interplay of Elementary Particles and Elementary Forces -- 1.1 An Attempt to Describe the Natural World Using the Smallest Number of Elementary Phenomena -- 1.2 General Foundations of the Physical Sciences --
1.2.1 Some principles -- 1.2.2 Some properties of the elementary phenomena are governed by very exact and strong laws of conservation -- 1.2.3 Prohibitions -- 1.3 Elementary Forces and Particles -- 1.3.1 Elementary forces -- 1.3.2
Elementary particles -- 1.4 Elementary Particles -- 1.4.1 “Bricks” and “mortar“ -- 1.4.2 Creation of the elementary particles -- 1.4.3 “Life” and “death” of elementary particles -- 1.5 The Existence of Atomic Nuclei Is Due to the
Forces of Attraction Between Their Nucleons -- 1.5.1 The weak force limits the number of stable hadrons -- 1.5.2 Strong force binds the nucleons together -- 1.5.3 Binding energy of a nucleon -- 1.6 Matter and Free Energy — The Intimate
Connection -- 1.7 What Are the Conclusions for the Future Development of Mankind? -- 2 The Universe: How Is It Observed Here and Now? Its Past and Possible Future -- 2.1 What Is the Universe? -- 2.1.1 A definition of the Universe --
2.1.2 Beginning of the Universe -- 2.2 Expansion of the Universe -- 2.2.1 The red shift -- 2.2.2 The five eras of the Universe -- 2.3 What Is Known About the Universe Today? -- 2.3.1 The average composition of the Universe -- 2.3.2
Chemical composition of cosmic matter -- 2.3.3 Composition of photons -- 2.4 The Universe as a Whole -- 2.5 The Future of the Universe -- 2.6 What Conclusions Can Be Drawn for the Future Development of Mankind? -- 3 The Origin and
Nuclear Evolution of Matter -- 3.1 The Creation of the Elementary Particles in the Very Early Universe -- 3.1.1 Unknown phase: Era of superunified force (Planckian Era or Very Hot Era) -- 3.1.2 Era of grand unified force (Hot Era) --
3.1.3 Era of unified force (Lukewarm Era) -- 3.1.4 Cold Era and Very Cold Era -- 3.2 Evolution of the Elementary Particles. A Very Rapid Development in the First Seconds of the Universe -- 3.2.1 Beginning of the Cold Era: Evolution in
the “Hadron Epoch” -- 3.2.2 Production of hydrogen, deuterium, and helium: The Universe a few seconds old Lepton Epoch -- 3.2.3 The Photon Epoch, from the first minute to the first million years. -- 3.3 The Beginning of the Present
Very Cold Era: The “Stars Era”. The Evolution of Galaxies, Stars, and Life -- 3.3.1 The largest of the cosmic structures: The development of galaxies -- 3.3.2 The evolution of stars the nuclear and gravitational reactors -- 3.3.3 The
protostar evolves from diffuse matter -- 3.3.4 The longest living stars, those of the Main Sequence -- 3.3.5 Red Giants: The cold stars with the hot interiors -- 3.3.6 Evolution towards hot dense stars -- 3.3.7 Explosion of a
supernova: The most spectacular event in a galaxy -- 3.3.8 Extremely dense stars: Neutron stars (pulsars) and black holes -- 3.4 The Burning of Hydrogen — Nucleosynthesis in the Stars -- 3.4.1 Deuterium: The fuel of protostars -- 3.4.2
The slow burning of hydrogen -- 3.4.3 The burning of hydrogen in a catalytic cycle assisted by carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen -- 3.5 Helium also Burns, but under More Extreme Conditions -- 3.5.1 Production of carbon from the burning of
helium -- 3.5.2 A very vital step: The production of oxygen -- 3.6 Carbon, Oxygen, and Other Elements of Medium Mass Burn in a Flash. -- 3.6.1 Energy production and energy required for nucleosynthesis -- 3.6.2 Iron, the nuclear ash --
3.7 The Systhesis of Heavy Elements: The Need for an External Energy Source -- 3.7.1 How can uranium be synthesised? -- 3.7.2 The “s-process”, the slow-process of neutron capture -- 3.7.3 The “r-process”, the rapid-process of neutron
capture -- 3.8 Cosmic Rays — A Strange Form of Matter -- 3.9 What Are the Conclusions for the Future of Mankind? -- 4 Chemical Evolution and the Evolution of Life: The Cosmic Phenomena -- 4.1 Chemical Evolution: Another Phase in the
Evolution of Matter -- 4.1.1 Special case of the electromagnetic force: The chemical force -- 4.1.2 The actors in the chemical play -- 4.2 Chemical Synthesis Occurs in Cosmic Space -- 4.2.1 Interstellar gas contains very many, often
very complex compounds -- 4.2.2 Some of the interstellar molecules exist in solid form -- 4.2.3 Comets: Rare and strange, but formidable, chemical reactors -- 4.2.4 Meteorites often consist of very “sophisticated” chemical compounds --
4.2.5 “Organic molecules” on the Moon and planets -- 4.3 The Origin of the Planets -- 4.3.1 Have the planets been formed “by chance”? -- 4.3.2 The protoplanet, the first stage of evolution -- 4.3.3 The chemical evolution of the Earth:
A complex and dramatic development -- 4.3.4 All stable elements present in the Universe exist on Earth -- 4.3.5 The history of the Earth has been influenced by the movement of the continents -- 4.3.6 The first phases of chemical
evolution were driven by different energy sources and were influenced by a number of factors -- 4.4 Synthesis of Complex Molecules on the Primitive Earth -- 4.4.1 The primitive atmosphere includes mostly molecules containing hydrogen
-- 4.4.2 The amino acids their ease of synthesis -- 4.4.3 How were the large molecules, the polymers, produced? -- 4.5 What Is Life? The Need for a General Definition -- 4.5.1 Could life have originated spontaneously? -- 4.5.2 The
physical aspect of life -- 4.5.3 What kind of elementary forces can play the role of energy carriers for living systems? -- 4.5.4 What kind of elementary particles can play the role of carriers of life? -- 4.6 The Chemical Elements,
Particularly the Light Elements, Are the Carriers of Life -- 4.6.1 Why are the light elements best fitted for this role? -- 4.6.2 Why is hydrogen oxide — water — the unique medium for living organisms? -- 4.6.3 The source of free
energy for life: The stars of the Main Sequence. -- 4.6.4 The chemical composition of the living organism is similar to the chemical composition of the Universe -- 4.6.5 Life is only possible in a Universe having the characteristics of
our type of Universe -- 4.7 What Can We Hope to Know About the Spontaneous Formation of Terrestrial Life? -- 4.7.1 The problem: The uniqueness of life in our present state of knowledge -- 4.7.2 The protobionts: The first living
structures -- 4.7.3 The evolution of the living being occurred at the switch-over point from one energy source to the next -- 4.8 Evolution of Living Beings -- 4.8.1 Genetic evolution -- 4.8.2 The evolution of Man -- 4.8.3 The
evolution of the brain -- 4.9 What Are the Conclusions for the Future of Mankind? -- 5 The Eternal Cycle of Matter on the Earth -- 5.1 Matter on This Planet Is Almost Indestructible -- 5.1.1 How stable is terrestrial matter? -- 5.1.2
Terrestrial matter is isolated by the gravitational field the amount of matter is constant -- 5.1.3 Division of the Earth into five “spheres” -- 5.2 The Gaseous Sphere Acts in the Exchange Between the Other Spheres -- 5.2.1 The main
components of the atmosphere -- 5.2.2 The most active component, oxygen, a product of the biosphere -- 5.2.3 Ozone: Modified oxygen which acts as a shield for the biosphere -- 5.2.4 The carbon cycle, a chain directly related to the
flow of energy in the biosphere and technosphere -- 5.2.5 The “inert” nitrogen cycle, which controls the activity of the biosphere -- 5.2.6 The micro-components of the atmosphere, the troublesome “details” -- 5.2.7 Dust particles, a
troublesome constituent of the atmosphere -- 5.3 The Hydrosphere — A Crucial Factor in the Existence of the Biosphere -- 5.3.1 The cycling of water, the largest terrestrial material cycle -- 5.3.2 Quality of water, quality of life --
5.3.3 Man’s demand for water is gigantic -- 5.3.4 Drinking water, where purity counts -- 5.3.5 The erosion of the planetary surface -- 5.4 The Solid Earth, the Litosphere -- 5.4.1 The main components of the Earth’s crust -- 5.4.2 The
Earth’s crust, the main source of materials for our civilisation -- 5.4.3 Metals “prepared” by Nature, the most widely used -- 5.5 Ordered Matter and Entropy -- 5.5.1 Concentration means increase of order and decrease of entropy --
5.5.2 Impact of substances in very small amounts: Poisons -- 5.5.3 Material dissipation and waste formation increases entropy -- 5.6 What Are the Conclusions for Mankind’s Future Development? -- 6 The Flow of Energy on the Earth -- 6.1
The Source of Free Energy on the Earth -- 6.1.1 The quality of energy: The ordered and disordered forms -- 6.1.2 The elementary forms of energy -- 6.1.3 How large is flux of energy? -- 6.2 The Energy Sources on the Earth -- 6.2.1.
Solar energy — The most important source -- 6.2.2 Spectrum and albedo of solar light -- 6.3 Solar Energy and Climate -- 6.3.1 The solar energy flux is not constant -- 6.3.2 Solar energy is transformed into numerous forms and types of
energy -- 6.3.3 The past and future of the terrestrial climate -- 6.3.4 The local climate depends on continental drift -- 6.4 Non-solar Terrestrial Energy Sources -- 6.4.1 Other non-solar flows of energy play a small but not
insignificant role -- 6.4.2 The importance of the amount of stored energy -- 6.5 How Much Energy Does Man Need? -- 6.5.1 Does man need energy at all? -- 6.5.2 The sources of energy are changeable -- 6.6 The Indirect Use of Solar Energy
-- 6.6.1 The biosphere as Man’s energy source for technology -- 6.6.2 Transformation of solar into kinetic energy: Wind -- 6.6.3 Transformed solar energy: The kinetic energy of falling water -- 6.6.4 The “insignificant” form of solar
energy: The heat of the oceans -- 6.6.5 The best forms of stored solar energy: Oil and coal -- 6.7 The Direct Technological Use of Solar Energy -- 6.7.1 The simplest way: Space heating -- 6.7.2 Solar energy converted into electricity
on the Earth“s surface -- 6.7.3 The extraterrestrial conversion of solar into electrical energy -- 6.8 Technological Use o
ISBN:9783642954535
Series:eBooks
Series:SpringerLink (Online service)
Series:Springer eBooks
Keywords: Physics , Environmental sciences , Geoecology , Environmental geology , Nature conservation , Physics , Physics, general , Environmental Science and Engineering , Nature Conservation , Geoecology/Natural Processes
Availability:Click here to see Library holdings or inquire at Circ Desk (x3401)
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